Category: Books

Peter Rugh: Not For Sale

When I was a teenager I used to skip class, nestle under a desk in my high school’s library where the school administrators wouldn’t find me and open up a tattered copy of Leaves of Grass. The way Walt Whitman wrote about America was so blithe and idealistic, operatic, and direct that I had to read the words aloud, which I did in a low voice so no one would overhear me

Daniel Hellinger: Review: Steve Ellner’s Latin America’s Radical Left

These collected essays successfully contextualize the issues confronting the movements, parties, and governments of Latin America’s radical left

Amien Essif: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google

If you were airdropped blindfolded into a strange town and given nothing but a bus ticket, to where would you ride that bus? You might be surprised to learn that there’s only one good answer, and that’s the public library

Marjorie Cohn: Book Review: ‘How Human Rights Can Build Haiti’

A review of How Human Rights Can Build Haiti by Fran Quigley

Ursula K. Le Guin: Remembering Freedom

Ursula K. Le Guin was honored at the National Book Awards tonight and gave a fantastic speech about the dangers to literature and how they can be stopped. As far as I know it’s not available online yet (update: the video is now online), so I’ve transcribed it from the livestream below. The parts in parentheses Read more…

Staughton Lynd: The Wobblies in their Heyday

Review of The Wobblies in their Heyday:  The Rise and Destruction of the Industrial Workers of the World during the World War I Era, by Eric Chester

Joe Emersberger: Book Review: Demands of the Dead

A review of Justin Podur’s novel, “Demands of the Dead”

Conn Hallinan: The Syrian Labyrinth

Review of Inside Syria: The Backstory of Their Civil War and What the World Can Expect

Al Gedicks: A Review of Stuart Kirsch’s Mining Capitalism

Kirsch is uniquely qualified to examine the relationship between mining corporations and their critics—he spent two decades as an anthropologist doing ethnographic research and participating in an indigenous political movement opposed to the Ok Tedi copper and gold mine in Papua New Guinea.

Seth Sandronsky: Empowering the Public?

Despite the lofty rhetoric redolent of benefitting the public’s interest, CCSS is not local empowerment of parents and teachers on behalf of students

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