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Recent ZNet

Kevin Pina: Haiti Under Siege

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti – Money is power and power is money. The Bush administration buys and sells political constituencies every day in pursuit of world domination. Haiti, which recently celebrated its bicentennial as the world’s first black republic, is not otherworldly or immune from purchase. Softening the ground for the transaction is the corporate media that Read more…

Haggai Borkow: A New Type of School – Our School

This is a transcript of a lecture given by Haggai Borkow in the 17th Annual Congress for School Effectiveness and Improvement (ICSEI) in Rotterdam, in January 2004.   Borkow, the co-founder and CEO of a software company (www.channelstorm.com) who had established a regional school where Israelis, Palestinians, Jordanians and Egyptians study together (www.nirschool.org) presents here Read more…

Nicole Colson: Camp Delta

THE FIRST introduction that most people had to the U.S. prison camp at Guantánamo Bay was enough to turn many stomachs. The Bush administration’s first photo op in January 2001 revealed helpless men being treated worse than animals at the whim of their captors. Housed in 6-by-8-foot wire cages exposed to the elements, the prisoners Read more…

Stefan Christoff: Living War

The youth who play football on the small streets and narrow alleys of Bourj El Barajneh represent an entire generation of Palestinian refugees in Lebanon who live in a day-to-day low intensity war. This is a war waged against Palestinian refugees by the government of Lebanon. It is not waged through military campaigns and guerrilla Read more…

Mitchell Plitnick: Singling Out Israel?

The Executive Commission of the European Union recently conducted an opinion poll of member states asking respondents to indicate which of 14 countries they believe is “a threat to world peace.” Slightly over half – 52 percent – said Iraq was a threat. Fifty-three percent cited Iran, North Korea and the United States. And 59 Read more…

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Chris Spannos: Canada Quietly Supported U.S. Iraq Invasion

Jan. 19, 2004 – US President George Bush’s announcement last Tuesday that Canada would be allowed to bid on billions of dollars in American-financed Iraqi reconstruction projects came in the wake of an ongoing controversy surrounding the degree of Canada‘s involvement in the war. Canada was excluded from the first negotiations in December when the Read more…

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George Monbiot: Global Warming

I’ve been in and around the environmental movement since the first Earth Day in 1970, which I attended while living in Philadelphia, Pa. For many years I’ve been following news reports and articles about the dangers of global warming. In 2002, during my Green Party U.S. Senate campaign in New Jersey, this was one of Read more…

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Tom Engelhardt: The opposite of Pax Americana is…

The other day I wrote a dispatch in part about a new U.S. intelligence term, “extraordinary rendition,” applied when our agents turn a “person of interest” (read: terrorist suspect) over to some friendly, or less than friendly, country ready to put the screws to him for us; in other words, torture-by-proxy. I commented then that Read more…

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Site Administrator: Reflections on the start of the new year

Consider the events of just a month ago and more, events whose consequences remain with us even as their impact recedes.   Here is what December 2003 looked like:   ·         Saddam Hussein is captured. The occupation goes on.   ·         A trial is planned. When, where and under whose aegis, as yet unknown. The Read more…

Eva Jasiewicz: Electricity in Basra

[Published Jan 8, 2004 on Occupation Watch] Five days ago, workers in Najebeeya and Haatha power plants, and power stations in Khor Zubair and She’iba, staged protests and walk-outs over low wages and long hours. In Najibeeya workers attacked the administration building and the boss himself Hammad Salem Rghadbaan – a man notorious for mistreating Read more…

Adolfo Gilly: The Prisoner and the Presidents

[translated by Forrest Hylton] At the meeting in Monterrey, the president of the United States prepares to “squeeze” Latin American governments, perhaps much more so on political than on economic terrain. In an electoral year, the spectacle occupies politics.  “Narcoterrorism” will be a recurrent theme. In this moment, one of the small pieces in this Read more…

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David Edwards: Logical Media Lunacy

Dotty Watchdogs In the last hours of a momentous year for the media, both the BBC and ITN reported that Dotty, an English bull terrier owned by Princess Anne, had been cleared by Buckingham Palace of fatally wounding Pharos, one of the Queen’s corgis. A second bull terrier, Florence, it seemed, had been responsible. The Read more…

Renato redentor Constantino: Loretta Brunio: Filipino

Frowns rarely reach her oval face, but smiles, too, do not come easily. Yet she is never expressionless; everything about her is implicit. Her eyes, the way her hands unconsciously stir as she ponders over a word, the way she nods or shakes her head as if she was just swaying. Her movements are measured Read more…

Maria Tomchick: Iraq: Money For Nothing

One of the most important news stories in 2004 is where the $18.6 billion in U.S. taxpayer money that Congress voted to spend on Iraqi reconstruction is to be spent and how. Already some of the details are available, and the trend is disturbing. The Bush administration opened up bidding on January 7 for $5 Read more…

La jornada: Mexicans Under Attack

[La Jornada Editorial, Translated by Miguel Alvarado] Mexicans have suddenly become suspects of terrorism in the eyes of Washington and local authorities. With that excuse, U.S. officials have launched an embarrassing and illegal campaign of control and intimidation at the Mexico City airport, imposed upon anybody who dares to visit the neighboring country. In addition, Read more…

Sheldon Rampton: Mad Cow USA

WHEN A single cow with mad cow disease was discovered in Washington state last month, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) lost no time at all. NCBA lobbyists were on the phone to members of Congress–at their home numbers, because they had left Washington for the holidays. The association paid for teams of experts in Read more…

Louise Christian: Guantanamo

Two years ago today, Feroz Abbasi, a British citizen arrested in Afghanistan, was one of the first detainees to be transferred hooded, shackled and manacled by the US military to Camp X-Ray in Guantanamo Bay. His mother, Zumrati, who lives in Croydon, was informed about five days later – by the media. It took a Read more…

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Gideon Levy: We Are All Soldiers at Checkpoints

The terminology used to be routine and clear: Whenever a unit of the Israel Defense Forces completed a mission – be it the aerial bombing of refugee camps in Lebanon, shelling terrorist headquarters in Syria or attacking missile sites in Egypt – the media would report that “our forces returned safely to their bases.” The Read more…

Asma Agbarieh: Flirting with Anti-Semitism

As Israeli violence rises in the Palestinian Territories, so does the flirtation with anti-Semitism among Arab opinion-makers, including writers, journalists and performers. The Protocols of the Elders of Zion (a Czarist forgery, often cited by Hitler, which portrays the Jews as conspiring to dominate the world) sells like hotcakes on the streets of the West Read more…

David Hilfiker: Mazin Jumaa’s Story

“Tuesday morning we visited the Iraq Organization for Human Rights, an Iraqi non-governmental organization (NGO) that examines human rights abuses under both the former and present government. We listened to a family tell about the shooting of Abd Wahab abd Razaq on July 13, 2003. Actually an Iraqi translator, Mazin Jumaa, who was at the Read more…

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Tom Engelhardt: My Hometown Paper

Small paragraphs on large topics (or sometimes you, the reader, have to do your own reporting):   Here, for instance, is the fourteenth paragraph of “Free Market Iraq? Not So Fast” by Daphne Eviatar in the Saturday Arts & Ideas section of the New York Times (1/10/04) on the legality of the occupation administration’s moves Read more…

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Tom Engelhardt: My Hometown Paper

This was no less evident at the Times in its week’s end coverage of former Treasury Secretary Paul O’Neill’s revelations in The Price of Loyalty, a new book by Wall Street Journal reporter Ron Suskind. O’Neill claimed that the president in meetings was “like a blind man in a group of deaf people,” Reaganesquely without Read more…

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Denis Vericel: Western Sahara

 [From Z Magazine, October 2002]   In November 1975 Morocco invaded the Western Sahara before Spain -the colonial power -could hold an overdue referendum on Sahrawi (i.e., Western Saharan) self-determination. The month before the invasion saw the release of two key findings: the International Court of Justice’s rejection of Morocco’s claim to the Western Sahara Read more…

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Michael Albert: Reply to Steps Related Comments on Infohop

I just had a look at the many comments here bearing on participatory economics. It is good to see the interest and discussion. I uploaded my reply to Steps, a few moments ago, and in this post I offer some brief responses to (only the) critical comments that appear here.   Anarcho writes… “Personally, I Read more…

Jacob Mundy: Western Sahara

[From Z Magazine, October 2002] In November 1975 Morocco invaded the Western Sahara before Spain—the colonial power—could hold an overdue referendum on Sahrawi (i.e., Western Saharan) self-determination. The month before the invasion saw the release of two key findings: the International Court of Justice’s rejection of Morocco’s claim to the Western Sahara and a UN visiting Read more…

Peter miguel Camejo: The Avocado Declaration

[The Avocado Declaration was initiated by Peter Miguel Camejo (www.votecamejo.org). Peter was the Green Party candidate for Governor of California in the 2002 general elections and in the 2003 recall election. This statement was issued by the Avocado Education Project.]   INTRODUCTION The Green Party is at a crossroads. The 2004 elections place before us Read more…

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Tom Engelhardt: Stealth Administration

Bill Berkowitz, columnist for the Working for Change website, recently began a piece, Whither America’s homegrown terrorists, with a description of the last couple of weeks of panic and fear-mongering:   “Just before Christmas, Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge raised the terrorist alert level from yellow — an elevated risk of terrorist attack — to Read more…

Andrew Gumbel: How the War Machine is driving the US Economy

What do the war in Iraq and the economic recovery in the United States have in common? More than one might expect, to judge from the last couple of rounds of US growth figures.   The war has been a large part of the justification for the Bush administration to run ever-widening budget deficits, and Read more…

Gilberto Lopez y rivas: Development within multicultural autonomies

At the seat of the European Parliament in Brussels, the researchers for the project Multicultural Autonomy: a necessary condition for sustainable development, have recently made public the preliminary results of a two and a half year study in six countries of Latin America: Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Ecuador, Bolivia and Brazil. In coordination with the Austrian Read more…

Eitan Ronel: I return my rank to you

January 4, 2004 To the Chief of Staff, Lieutenant General Moshe Ya’alon: On Israel’s 51st Independence Day, on Ammunition Hill, I received from you the rank of a Lieutenant Colonel. I was discharged from active reserve duty in the IDF after 31 years of service, during which I participated as an Artilleryman in the Yom Read more…

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Norman Solomon: Running On Empty

Ralph Nader plans to announce this month whether he’ll be running for president in 2004. Some believe that such a campaign is needed to make a strong political statement nationwide. But if Nader does run this year, what kind of support — in the form of volunteers, resources and votes — could he reasonably expect? Read more…

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David Edwards: Climate Catastrophe

Today’s Guardian and Independent newspapers both report that over the next 50 years, global warming could drive a quarter of land animals and plants into extinction. According to a four-year research project by scientists from eight countries, published today in the prestigious journal Nature, 1 million species will have disappeared by 2050. The findings have Read more…

James Brooke: Japan and China Battle for Russia’s Oil and Gas

VOSTOCHNY, Russia – For now, Krylova Cape is not much to see: a spit of land between the Russian taiga forest and the Sea of Japan, its soil being graded a bit by a bright yellow bulldozer. But what is taking shape here is central to a pitched struggle between the two most important economies Read more…

Mike Prokosch: Next Steps in the US Global Justice Movement

Miami isn’t just a place name anymore. Like Seattle and Cancun, it’s a moment when the free trade juggernaut tipped over on the side of the road. After Miami, the ideal corporate trade treaty — one sweeping set of rules that binds all countries forever — lies splintered into dozens of country-to-country agreements and a Read more…

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Mark Weisbrot: The Fed and the Bubble

Alan Greenspan used the occasion of his speech to the American Economic Association to defend his legacy. His 16-year record as Chairman of the Federal Reserve is certainly mixed, but there is one mistake he shouldn’t be allowed to brush off: the stock market bubble. But that’s exactly what he tried to do, claiming that Read more…

Wilson Borja: Colombia’s Winds of Change

An old legend says that when God made Colombia, St Peter questioned “Why have you given so much natural wealth to one country?”  God replies, “You haven’t seen the leaders I will give them yet”. It is this same wealth which is at the heart of the West’s close interest in Colombia, and it is Read more…

Mike Prokosch: What to Make of Miami

Miami isn’t just a place name anymore. Like Seattle and Cancun, it’s a moment when the free trade juggernaut tipped over on the side of the road. After Miami, the ideal corporate trade treaty — one sweeping set of rules that binds all countries forever — lies splintered into dozens of country-to-country agreements and a Read more…

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Noam Chomsky: After the War

[Speech delivered at Columbia University, NYC, November 20, 2003, at an event commemorating Edward Said.  Transcript courtesy of Democracy Now.] The first remark has to do with the title. The title that was announced was after the war, which is a good topic. We should be concerned with what is coming ahead, but any title Read more…

Suzanne abu Tair: none

 

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John Pilger: American Terrorist

Forget Hutton. He will not reveal what the US and UK authorities really don’t want you to know: that radiation illnesses caused by uranium weapons are now common in Iraq. By John Pilger   The disaster in Iraq is rotting the Blairite establishment. Blair himself appears ever more removed from reality; his latest tomfoolery about Read more…

Democracy Now: Arresting the Uninsured

What do the Emir of Kuwait and the working poor of the United States have in common? Not much, except when it comes to paying for health care in the United States. They all pay the highest price: up to 500% more than the hospital receives from insured patients. That’s because hospitals negotiate discounts with Read more…

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Gideon Levy: The Price of Ignorance

The suicide bomber at the Geha Junction, Shehad Hanani, was from Beit Furik, one of the most imprisoned villages in the territories that is surrounded by earth roadblocks on all sides. It’s a place where women in labor and the sick have to risk walking through fields to get to the hospital in adjacent Nablus. Read more…

Jamie Doucette: Biting The Arms Of The State: Migrant Workers Continue To Fight

“This time the police were coordinating with the immigration thugs,” claimed an anonymous Equality Trade Union member after an attack on their peaceful protest in the Itaewon neighbourhood of Seoul, South Korea, yesterday. The Equality Trade Union – Migrant’s Branch (ETU-MB) was protesting at the Bangladeshi Embassy Wednesday, following the deportation of two of their Read more…

Milton Fisk: Higher Premiums Mean Higher Profits

Cost shifting is the name of the game as management grapples with the rising expense of employee health care. Employers are having employees pay more out of pocket through higher deductibles, larger drug co-pays, and higher premiums. The key word is “premium.” When employers contract with insurers for their employees’ health care coverage, a premium Read more…

Suzanne abu Tair: none

English is such a wonderfully malleable language, especially the American branch of it. New words, phrases, even recombined bits and pieces of words pour out of our mouths (or our computers) and — poof — before you know it, they’re in our lives and the dictionaries. Our new realities — whether the Internet (after all, Read more…

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David Graeber: Anarchism, Or The Revolutionary Movement Of The Twenty-first Century

It is becoming increasingly clear that the age of revolutions is not over. It’s becoming equally clear that the global revolutionary movement in the twenty first century, will be one that traces its origins less to the tradition of Marxism, or even of socialism narrowly defined, but of anarchism. Everywhere from Eastern Europe to Argentina, Read more…

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Chalmers Johnson: Sorrows of Empire: An Interview

Your bestselling book, Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire, originally published in March 2000, offered a controversial account of American global policies. How has the world changed since the publication of Blowback?   We are without question in greater danger of terrorist attacks today than we were on September 11 two years ago. Read more…

Jamie Doucette: Towards a Transnational Grassroots:

Migrant Workers in South Korea have just lost two competent, passionate advocates for Migrant Workers’ Rights; pretty soon they may lose many more, that is, if the government’s attacks on the Equality Trade Union – Migrants’ Branch –- the only nationwide union of undocumented migrant workers in existence anywhere -– are successful.   In the Read more…

Kabir Uddin: an interview with Kabir Uddin of the Equality Trade Union

In North America, there has been a shift away from convergence style protests to more localized actions that challenge global capital with a paradigm of action that has come to be known loosely as direct-action casework. Influenced by a variety of social ideas from anti-imperialism, unionism, and anarchism, the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty, the Bus Read more…

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Robert Fisk: Death in Custody

‘The British said my son would be free soon. Three days later I had his body’ The last time Lieutenant Colonel Daoud Mousa of the Iraqi police saw his son Baha alive was on 14 September, as British soldiers raided the Basra hotel where the young man worked as a receptionist. “He was lying with Read more…

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