julycover-online

July/August 2016
Volume 29
Number 7/8

ZMAG MISSION

left Box

Z Magazine is an independent monthly magazine founded in 1988. Our mission is to publish in depth articles that critique society's political, economic, social life and institutions. We see the race, class, and gender dimensions of personal life as equally important in understanding current circumstances and as necessary for developing visions and strategies for progressive change.

 

 

IBC-

 

DONATIONS

We survive through income from paid subscriptions, sales of videos and books, online Sustainers, individual donations. and periodic fundraising. We are non-profit, tax exempt under the Institute for Social and Cultural Communications. We are currently in dire need of funds. To donate by mail, send checks payable to Z Magazine, 215 Atlantic Ave, Hull, MA 02045 (508- 548-9063). To donate online go to: www.zcommunications.org and become a Sustainer.

_________________

Recent ZMagazine

avatar
Michael Bronski: The Destiny of Biology

Anne Fausto-Sterling is one of the leading theorists on science, sexuality, and gender. Trained as a molecular biologist, and a professor of Biology and Women’s Studies at Brown University, her research and writing covers a broad rage of topics: the science and politics of sex hormone research, theories of the etiology of sexual orientation, the Read more…

avatar
David Cromwell: Oil Propaganda Wars

In November 1999, the High Court in London ruled that the UK government had failed to uphold the EU Habitats Directive when it awarded offshore oil licenses in British waters of the North Atlantic. Wildlife and ecosystems were being put at risk in this “Atlantic Frontier.” But now the island of St. Kilda, the UK’s Read more…

Mara Dodge: The Juvenile Court

In 1999, 100 years after the establishment of the nation’s first juvenile court in Cook County (Chicago), Illinois, nearly all states have succeeded in passing sweeping legislation to “criminalize” or “adultify” their juvenile justice systems. Virtually every state now makes it far easier to transfer juveniles to adult court, hold them in adult jails, and Read more…

Boutros Boutros-ghali: none

Random House, NY, 1999, 352 pp, Review by Tom Gallagher Some will remember that before serving as spokesperson for the victims of erectile dysfunction, Senator Robert Dole was the 1996 Republican nominee for the United States presidency. The election years for the four year term of the presidency and the five year UN Secretary General’s Read more…

avatar
Edward Herman: Russia: U.S. Rival, Dependent, Victim

The U.S. establishment’s and media’s treatment of post-Soviet Russia has been confused, sometimes hostile, and more often than not, apologetic. This is because Russia occupies the odd position of being simultaneously a rival and obstacle, on the one hand, and a dependent and virtual client state, on the other hand. It is a pale shadow Read more…

Jeff Melton: Protect Griffy Alliance vs. Indiana University

Early last fall, Indiana University revealed its intention to lease 300 acres of university land to a hastily formed private corporation (formed by IU alumni with close ties to the board of trustees) for the purpose of building a private golf and country club. The golf course, to be built next to the existing course, Read more…

James Petras: The Rural Landless Workers Movement

Over the past 30 years, Brazilian governments—both military and civilian—have proclaimed the need for “agrarian reform” but have resisted implementing an effective policy. INCRA (National Institute of Colonization and Agrarian Reform) the federal government agency in charge of land distribution has pursued a policy of settling landless families in distant frontier lands, usually distant from Read more…

avatar
Vijay Prashad: An Afro-Dalit Story

On January 30, 1998, I went on air with Ron Daniels for his two-hour radio program on the National Urban Radio Network. The theme for the show was Gandhi and Dr. King, since it was the 50th anniversary of Gandhi’s assassination. After a brief back and forth, we went to the phones. From the first Read more…

avatar
Z Staff: For Justice and Against Prison

The Manchester Guardian of February 15 includes an article by a Duncan Campbell of Los Angeles. Here we borrow from his research and from prior Z essays by Christian Parenti, George Wright, and Stephen Shalom. U.S. citizens constitute 5 percent of the global population. U.S. inmates constitute 25 percent of the world’s prisoners. The U.S. Read more…

John h. Rodgers: World Hunger: Twelve Myths

New York: Grove Press, 1998, 270 pp, paperback, second edition Review by John H. Rodgers      In the wake of one crisis after another in the world financial system, there is growing space for the reconsideration of many economic nostrums cherished by the neoliberal establishment. The efficiency of the “free market” in the allocation of Read more…

avatar
E. Wayne Ross: The Spectacle of Standards & Summits

  In 1989, President Bush called the nation’s governors together for the first national education summit. They set goals and tried to develop ways to measure progress, but were stymied by resistance to federal interference in local school decisions. Seven years later, governors and 44 top corporate leaders met at IBM’s conference center in Palisades, Read more…

avatar
Lydia Sargent: 37.7 Seconds, Part IV

In Parts I and II of this series I looked at the “scientific” claims made about women in Dianne Hales’s book Just Like A Woman. In Part III I began examining Helen Fisher’s book The First Sex, published by Random House and widely reviewed, “fascinating” according to the New York Times. Fisher, an anthropologist at Read more…

avatar
Site Administrator: Booming Economic Inequality, Falling Voter Turnout

We should have a lot more to show for an economic boom that recently broke the record for the longest expansion in our nation’s history. February marked 107 months—nine years—of uninterrupted economic growth beginning in March 1991. The previous record was 106 months from February 1961 to December 1969. The 1990s boom has been a Read more…

Martin Thomas: Bill Bradley: Progressives’ Pal or Wall Street Stooge?

In the next decade, the most pressing issue likely to face the president will involve disputes over international economics, finance, and trade. It is important we have a president who needs no tutoring,” says David M. Smick, former chief of staff for Jack Kemp and Bob Dole advisor, in a Washington Post op-ed titled “GOP Read more…

avatar
Mark Weisbrot: Anti-WTO Organizing

  The demonstrations against the WTO in Seattle were probably among the most effective protests in modern American history. The sequel—on April 16 in Washington DC, at the IMF/World Bank spring meetings—may have an even greater impact on the world. The main reason that these demonstrations can be so effective is that U.S. foreign economic Read more…

avatar
Elizabeth Martinez: The New Youth Movement In California

  Last February, 42 mostly professional adults—lawyers, teachers, civil rights leaders, and older activists—were arrested for shutting down the Oakland jail to demonstrate against a vicious juvenile crime law. They did this out of a strong belief that it was time to show adult support for the many youth fighting that new injustice. In the Read more…

avatar
Elizabeth Martinez: Black & Brown Workers Alliance Born In North Carolina

  In recent years, thousands of Latino migrants have come to work in the Southeast and often remained as permanent residents. In North Carolina alone, the number of Latinos rose from about 77,000 in 1990, according to the Census Bureau, to over 300,000 today. They are mostly Mexican but also Guatemalan and other nationalities. Latino Read more…

avatar
David Barsamian: Monopolies, NPR, & PBS

Robert McChesney is Professor of Communications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a leading critic of corporate media. He is the author of Telecommunications, Mass Media and Democracy. His latest book is Rich Media, Poor Democracy, published by University of Illinois Press. DAVID BARSAMIAN: Will Rogers once said, “I only know what Read more…

Michael Steinberg: Stop McNukes

The deregulation of the U.S. electrical industry was supposed to end monopoly control of that commodity. Unfortunately the nuclear component of the industry has tainted this process. Across the nation ratepayers are getting stuck with paying for billions of dollars in “stranded costs” for inefficient aged nukes. These are the portions of bad investments in Read more…

Jeremy Leggett: none

Penguin Books, 1999 Review by David Cromwell In January 1991, almost seven years before the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change set an overall target for industrialized countries to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 5.2 percent, one eminent meteorologist stated, “It’s possible there will be unprecedented climate change.” This was no far-sighted warning from a Read more…

avatar
Michael Bronski: The State of Queer Film

Nearly a decade ago it looked as though we were about to enter a Renaissance of gay and lesbian filmmaking. Unable to have access to mainstream movie making, independent filmmakers, writers, and producers began turning out a remarkable body of work. Todd Haynes’s brilliant The Karen Carpenter Story and Poison that moved a gay sensibility Read more…

Sandy Carter: 1999 In Review

In the decade I’ve been writing about music and popular culture in the pages of Z, I can’t recall a year when the pop music mainstream seemed more empty of soul and critical thought than in 1999. Commercially speaking, this was a year dominated by a steady flow of cheap thrill rock and pop acts Read more…

Michael Demers: Living in Delray Beach

The city of Delray Beach, Florida represents a world of two distinct realities for two distinct groups of people: those of upper income and those of middle to low income. The current trends that are shaping the downtown section of this city of over 50,000 inhabitants are both wonderful and tragic—depending on whom you ask. Read more…

avatar
Ted Glick: A Unity Movement Begins to Emerge

It is the worst of times, and it is the best of times.” With these words Victoria Jackson Gray-Adams, one of the meeting’s conveners, described the context within which 45 leaders from the Independent Progressive Politics Network met for a weekend of “progressive dialogue” from December 4 to 5, 1999. As Gray- Adams elaborated, it Read more…

Christopher Black: An Unindicted War Criminal

& Edward S. Herman Among the many ironies of the NATO war against Yugoslavia was the role of the International Criminal Tribunal and its chief prosecutor, Louise Arbour, elevated by Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien to Canada’s highest court in 1999. It will be argued here that that award was entirely justified on the grounds Read more…

Steven Hill: San Francisco Mayoral Race

In an otherwise off political year, the San Francisco mayoral race in December 1999 commanded national attention. The quintessential “only in San Francisco” story line of the mainstream media set Willie Brown, the powerful, liberal African American incumbent, against Tom Ammiano, an openly gay male who was a teacher and stand-up comedian before becoming president Read more…

Jim Smith: Politics in Russia

Boris Kagarlitsky is a Moscow-based writer, academic, and democratic socialist political activist. He was a leader of the Party of Labor, which was outlawed by Boris Yeltsin in the aftermath of the 1993 “presidential coup” that resulted in the destruction of parliament. Since then he has served as an advisor to various trade unions and Read more…

Sanford Kelson: Protesting SOA

The Columbus, Georgia police estimated that on November 21, 1999 there were nearly 10,000 at the front gate of Fort Benning protesting the School of the Americas which is located on the base. SOA Watch believes the correct number is 12,000. The protest is held yearly on the anniversary of the murders of six Jesuit Read more…

avatar
Z Staff: A Simple Plea

Here are the opening lines of a piece by Marc Cooper, Nation writer and radio correspondent, in the New York Press, a free weekly newspaper. “I make no New Year’s resolution. Instead, I have a simple plea: Oh Lord, please make 2000 a year free of Mumia. That’s right. That’s no typo. I said free Read more…

avatar
Lydia Sargent: Reading “feminism” and glimpses into the “female brain”

In Parts I and II of this series about reading “feminism” I examined the claims in Just Like A Woman by Dianne Hales. I left off with an introduction to The First Sex by Helen Fisher whose theme is that through deep evolutionary history, women and men developed different abilities and brain structures. She explores Read more…

avatar
Norman Solomon: none

  A few numbers tell a dramatic story about extreme changes in media fascination with the Internet. After the 1990s ended, I set out to gauge how news coverage of cyberspace shifted during the last half of the decade. The comprehensive Nexis database yielded some revealing statistics: In 1995, media outlets were transfixed with the Read more…

avatar
Starhawk: How We Shut Down the WTO

It’s been months since  I joined the blockade that shut down the opening meeting of the WTO. Since getting out of jail, I’ve been reading the media coverage and trying to make sense out of the divergence between what I know happened and what has been reported. Most of what has been written is so Read more…

avatar
Paul Street: Capitalism and Democracy “Don’t Mix Very Well”

Economic globalization enthusiasts like Bill Clinton, Madeline Albright, Tony Blair, New York Times foreign policy columnist Thomas Friedman, and the unelected officials of the World Trade Organization repeat a classic Cold War mistake by claiming that globalization is advancing two sides of the same historical coin: capitalism and democracy. One does not have to be Read more…

Judith Achieng: Outlook 2000

Judith Achieng With only limited success in enforcing universal respect for children’s rights so far, UN agencies and rights groups are hoping the next century will see new efforts to achieve the goals of the 1990 World Children Summit and other rights accords. "The challenge so far is how to make a reality, the rights Read more…

avatar
Michael Albert: A Q & A on the WTO, IMF, World Bank, and Activism

Culled from work by Albert, Elaine Bernard, Peter Bohmer, Jeremy Brecher, Dorothy Guellec, Robin Hahnel, Russell Mokhiber, Mark Weisbrot, and Robert Weissman Back to ZNet Top Back to ZNet’s Global Economics Top We recommend reading straight through, but if you want a specific question answered you may wish to jump to it, below… What is Read more…

avatar
David Bacon: Will A Social Clause In Trade Agreements Advance International Solidarity?

David Bacon On November 30 the AFL-CIO mobilized thousands of union members to demonstrate in Seattle outside the meeting of trade ministers of the World Trade Organization. The labor federation called for incorporating the rights of working people around the world into the text of future trade agreements, and for treating the impact of trade Read more…

avatar
David Barsamian: Challenging Corporate Power

Barsamian Richard Grossman is co-director of the Program on Corporations, Law and Democracy. He is co-author of Taking Care of Business: Citizenship and the Charter of Incorporation. He lectures widely on issues of corporate power, law, and democracy. BARSAMIAN: You write in an essay, "Giant corporations govern. In the Constitution of the United States they Read more…

avatar
Bill Berkowitz: Talk Radio’s Laura Schlessinger

Berkowitz Over the past several years Dr. Laura Schlessinger has taken talk radio to new heights with her extraordinarily popular and controversial advice program. She has adapted the call-in format to her own special brand of schtick—a no excuses, "tough love" approach which frequently turns into a confrontational bloodletting of her callers. But that doesn’t Read more…

avatar
Site Administrator: The Road From Seattle

Jeremy Brecher, with Tim Costello & Brendan Smith The Battle of Seattle marks a turning point in the politics of globalization. It represents the emergence of a worldwide movement seeking to put limits on global capital. The Road from Seattle provides greatly expanded opportunities for that movement—if it can avoid the potholes in the road. Read more…

avatar
Michael Bronski: Justice is Blind and Gagged

Michael Bronski With a final flurry of media attention the trials of Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson for the brutal murder of Matthew Shepard are now over. But in the quiet after such an emotional social and political storm, two things have become evident. The first is that the image of Matthew Shepard as the Read more…

Sandy Carter: The Indigo Girls & Rage Against the Machine

Carter When the Atlanta, Georgia-based duo the Indigo Girls signed on with Epic Records in 1988, the mainstream music market was getting on the bandwagon of a new "folk revival" trend triggered by the surprising breakthroughs of Tracy Chapman, Michelle Shocked, and Suzanne Vega. With the 1989 release of their major label debut, Indigo Girls, Read more…

avatar
Neve Gordon: Barak’s Economic Program

Neve Gordon In 1992, it was still unclear that Bill Clinton’s election would mark the advent of a new breed of leaders. Yet a few years later Tony Blair was elected in England and Lionel Jospin in France. When Germany’s Gerhard Sch- roeder and Israel’s Ehud Barak entered office it became apparent that we weren’t Read more…

avatar
Robin Hahnel: China & the WTO

Robin Hahnel After declining to sign a "better deal" last April, the Clinton administration signed off on conditions for permitting China to enter the World Trade Organization (WTO) in November. Even though China’s premier was in Washington last April begging for Clinton’s signature to lock in a victory for his faction of economic liberalizers over Read more…

avatar
Edward Herman: Hitchens on Serbia and East Timor

Edward S. Herman In each U.S. war there are liberals and leftists who lend it support, and even larger numbers who don’t oppose it because the issues and stakes involved seem unclear. Both support and silence are encouraged by the invariable demonization of the enemy and the surge of patriotic support for our troops fighting Read more…

avatar
Lydia Sargent: 37.7 Seconds, Part II

Lydia Sargent As I said in Part I, the title 37.7 seconds refers to the average amount of time fathers spent each day communicating with their babies during the first three months of life, according to a 1971 study quoted in Has Feminism Changed Science? by Londa Schie- binger. This statistic seemed incredible to me, Read more…

Amanda Scioscia: Keeping My Religion

Amanda Scioscia As I stood face to face with Marta Alanis, regional coordinator of Catholics for A Free Choice in Latin America, we looked at each other with scrutiny. "I thought you’d be older," she said. "I thought you’d be more Catholic," I replied. I was baptized Catholic out of respect for cultural tradition, though Read more…

avatar
Michael Albert: On Trashing and Movement Building

This is a response to a post-Seattle debate troubling many folks regarding movement tactics. As a preface, it goes without saying, I hope, that we all understand that as far as violence is concerned, the violent parties in Seattle were first and foremost the President of the U.S., his entourage, the other major heads of Read more…

avatar
David Bacon: Dried Garlic And A Busted Union

David Bacon & Bill Berkowitz King City, California is a tough agricultural town about an hour south of Salinas. In King City, vegetables are king—people mostly work in the fields picking them, or in the huge Basic Vegetable Products plant, drying garlic and onions for shipment all over the world. It’s been the height of Read more…

Shahid Bolsen: The Pakistan Coup

Shahid Bolsen Pakistan has the bomb. It also has an antagonizing enemy, which also has the bomb. It has a passionately disputed territory which it dearly wants to see liberated from its enemy. Now, Pakistan has a new military leader who has proven his willingness to actively engage the enemy for the sake of that Read more…

avatar
Michael Bronski: Deliver Us From Reverends

Michael Bronski Across the country the headlines made everything look great. The Raleigh News and Observer blared "Falwell Apologizes to Gays" while the San Jose Mercury News trumpeted "Falwell Welcomes Gays." The Washington Post posited a beltway-spin deal with "Mutual Apology for Hateful Speech: Christian Leader Falwell, Gay Rights Activist Talk Tolerance" and Time magazine Read more…

WP-Backgrounds by InoPlugs Web Design and Juwelier Schönmann
Skip to toolbar