Naming Names: The 90 Companies Destroying Our Planet


Narrow it down to the real power-brokers and decision-makers—the CEO's of fossil fuel companies or the energy ministers from the largest petro-states—says climate researcher Richard Heede, and the actual individuals most responsible for the political world's continued refusal to address the planetary crisis of climate change "could all fit on a Greyhound bus or two."

In a newly compeleted study by Heede and his colleagues at the 10.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:
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Offered in advance to the Guardian newspaper, which created an line-height:150%;font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:
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10.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:
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As the Guardian's Suzanne Goldenberg font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";
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10.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:
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Michael Mann, a U.S. climate scientist who spoke to the Guardian about the possible impact of the list, said he hoped it would bring greater scrutiny to the gas, oil and coal companies who are most responsible for past emissions because these are the same companies poised to continue burning the vast carbon reserves still in the ground. "What I think could be a game changer here is the potential for clearly fingerprinting the sources of those future emissions," he said. "It increases the accountability for fossil fuel burning. You can't burn fossil fuels without the rest of the world knowing about it."

And Al Gore added: "This study is a crucial step forward in our understanding of the evolution of the climate crisis. The public and private sectors alike must do what is necessary to stop global warming. Those who are historically responsible for polluting our atmosphere have a clear obligation to be part of the solution."

The alternative, however—as almost zero progress, and possibly lost ground, has been the result of the last several rounds of international climate talks—is a global uprising from below, led by social justice organizations, environmentalists, and civil society who are willing to act where governments and the private sector have refused.

As Michael T. Klare, an energy expert and professor at Hampshire College, line-height:150%;font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:
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"Times New Roman";mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"”> become an inescapable feature of daily life across the planet, more people are joining environmental groups and engaging in increasingly bold protest actions. Sooner or later, government leaders are likely to face multiple eruptions of mass public anger and may, in the end, be forced to make radical adjustments in energy policy or risk being swept aside.