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An Interview With Michael Albert, One Of The Authors Of “Occupy Strategy”


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Occupy Strategy line-height:150%;font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:
"Times New Roman";mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"”> also compellingly explains why even the most uncompromising revolutionaries ought to support reforms: "If no one was seeking reforms—and no one ever had—then virtually no one would be revolutionary…. [T]o reject reforms is not only callous and insubstantial, it is also tantamount to rejecting revolution by rejecting aspects of the processes by which revolutionary movements are born, tempered, strengthened, and educated."

At the same time, however, in fighting for reforms, we need to do so in "non-reformist" ways:

line-height:150%;font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:
"Times New Roman";mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"”> draws on examples from previous left experiences, mostly in the United States, trying to analyze their strengths and weaknesses. The authors note that veterans of the sixties often defensively reject criticisms of the movements of those days, but, as Occupy Strategy wisely observes:

  • mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"”>Why did you write this book? What do you hope to achieve from it?
  • mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"”>Occupy Theory mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"”>
  • Yes, roughly. Occupy Theory claims its rather straightforward concepts—which correspond to what left activists have been formulating for a long time, with one additional key feature—can be used,

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