Satanic Culture: A Luciferians Wet Dream


Satanic Culture: A Luciferians Wet Dream

11 August 2013

Jonathan Gillis

Being in a nearly absolutely superficial and controlled environment, with every thought, word, and movement monitored, recorded, and manipulated to certain and varying degrees, one always seems drawn to constantly re-discover the layers of dimensional consciousness. One seems to find it necessary to be constantly reminded of the interconnectivity of life and the uniqueness of the individual, notwithstanding the artificially, invasive, bellicose, contrived interconnectivity of modern life within the matrix of totalitarianism. Decentralized, nonhierarchical sovereignty has been abridged to the mere notional, being entertained in abstract theorizing by progressive, leftish types or by others of varying political and ideological stripes. All reality is reduced to the animatronics and generally ordered proceedings of the overarching global enslavement system. Physical, social, emotional, and intellectual containment is normalized, though the illusion of prevalent liberty and security is maintained by the façade of the mainstream media, and popular culture generally. This, while all are not secure, while the evils wrought by money are manifest in abominably ritualized ways, hidden in plain sight. The fact is, our inalienable liberties, like our security, has been largely privatized and sold for profit, diminished, and purposefully obstructed by the very same power-players that say one thing to millions of people while meaning something quite different altogether. This constant overdose on doublespeak muddies the waters of freewill, if it does not poison them. Proclaiming beneficence, while carrying out their insidious purposes, those in power and their enforcing class, blasphemy God and fundamental decency in all their proceedings, be they secret or public. The normalization of duplicity and the doctrinal double standard of propagating information whenever and however it serves the vested interests of concentric hegemonic power, discourages and handicaps critical inquiry of and from the proletarians. Thus we trudge forth, armed with truth, arrived at through resilient self-education, our perspective ever evolving in refinement; the truth, while exploited for nefarious purposes, the billion dollar public relations industry consistently fails to silence. Yet, we are so dissociated within our own minds, we are so conditioned to predetermined responses, we are so sensitized to contrived stimuli, we slavishly work at exiting one room in this house of horrors, only to find ourselves, to our utter dismay, trapped in a slightly different room. Once again, tasked with determining how to ensue, the illusory apparatus of “free will” firmly intact, we are carried through the motions noticeable through a qualified and controlled existence. “It is obvious that no idea can lead beyond the existing spectacle, but only beyond the existing ideas about the spectacle.” 

So it is that we consume everything and everyone, and are consumed by everything and everyone. The hunger of the dominant way of life, which is in fact antithetical to life, is a hunger which is never satisfied and can never be sated. “The pseudo-need imposed by modern consumption clearly cannot be opposed by any genuine need or desire which is not itself shaped by society and its history. The abundant commodity stands for the total breach in the organic development of social needs. Its mechanical accumulation liberates unlimited falsification of social life.”  

“All the branches of knowledge, which continue to develop as the thought of the spectacle, have to justify a society without justification, and constitute a general science of false consciousness. This thought is completely conditioned by the fact that it cannot and will not investigate its own material basis in the spectacular system.”   

“Specialists in the power of the spectacle, an absolute power within its system of language without response, are absolutely corrupted by their experience of contempt and of the success of contempt; and they find their contempt confirmed by their knowledge of the     

The dreadful reality that occurs in the real world, not the manufactured illusory one of mass spectacle, is not the gradual, and perpetual, result of an articulated ideology, at least not an openly publicized one. It “is an ideology nonetheless, for it imposes a way of life, a set of relations among people and ideas, about which there has been no consensus, no discussion and no opposition. Only compliance. Public consciousness has not yet assimilated the point that technology is ideology.”  

Take television for example. Social, economic, and political philosophies and programs revolve around, are established by, produced and broadcasted through, TV. What are the immediate and long-term objectives of the owners of TV; the handful of conglomerated mega-corporations that own virtually everything seen or heard? The profit-motive is not the be-all-end-all ideology, though in and of itself that is certainly inherently political and social. Three sub-ideologies, if you will, spring to mind, namely, mass control, advertising (selling) of commercial products and commodities, and the mainstream (organized) system of beliefs, values, and ideas. These are merely three points to the same triangle of power.

TV “has made entertainment itself the natural format for the representation of all experience. Our television set keeps us in constant communion with the [manufactured] world, but it does so with a face whose smiling countenance is unalterable.” The formula of the commercial contains an element of psychotherapy which is axiomatic. “The commercial asks us to believe that all problems [even imagined ones] are solvable, that they are solvable fast, and that they are solvable fast through the interventions of technology, techniques and chemistry.” 

“Moreover, commercials have the advantage of vivid visual symbols through which we may easily learn the lessons being taught. Among those lessons are that short and simple messages are preferable to long and complex ones; that drama is to be preferred over exposition; that being sold solutions is better than being confronted with questions about problems.” To give another example, take the clock. The manufacturing of the clock has had “the effect of disassociating time from human events and thus nourishes the belief in an independent world of mathematically measurable sequences. Moment to moment, it turns out, is not God’s conception, or nature’s. It is man conversing with himself about and through a piece of machinery he created.”    

“Our entire society has begun to suffer the madness of the astronaut; uprooted, floating in space, encased in our metal worlds, with automated systems neatly at hand, communicating mainly with machines, following machine logic, disconnected from the earth and all organic reality, without contact with a multidimensional, biologically diverse world and with the nuances of world views entirely unlike our own, unable to view ourselves from another perspective, we are alienated to the nth degree.”   

“We have entered into a [world] that has been re-formed by machines; we are a species that lives its life within mechanistic creations; our environment is a product of our minds. Locked inside our cities and suburbs, working in our offices, controlling and conceptualizing nature as a raw material for our consumption, and now even including     

“Our society is characterized by an inability to leave anything in nature alone. Every piece of land, every creature, every mineral in the oceans, every growing plant, every mountain, every inch of desert is examined for its potential contribution to commercial development and exploitation, and to the expansion of technological society.” “The exploration of the earth’s uncharted wilderness is now nearly complete. The drive of Westerners to convert wild, uncontrolled, and unexplored terrain into productive commodity forms is seeking new frontiers. Lately it has found two; explorations off the earth, into the vast wilderness of space; and exploration into the infinitely small, the genetic structure of life.” 

“Today’s technological pioneers consider themselves original thinkers, but they are only the latest in a long line of advocates for the same set of propositions, the most prominent of which is that nature sets no limits on the degree to which humans may intervene in and alter the natural world. Manifesting the arrogance of Technological Man, the technopioneers assume they are authorized to go anywhere and rearrange anything, including alterations in the structure of human life, animal life, and now natural from itself.” 

All “corporations share an identical economic, cultural, and social vision, and seek to accelerate society’s (and individual) acceptance of that vision.” 

“Corporations are inherently bold, aggressive, and competitive. Though they exist in a society that claims to operate by moral principles, they are structurally amoral. It is inevitable that they will dehumanize people who work for them, and dehumanize the overall society as well.” “How many pupils did Michelangelo have? What about Monet or Van Gogh? It is clear then that art cannot be taught. For sure, there may be some rudimentary physical actions involved but the spirit of art cannot be taught. It can only be nurtured by not interfering with it. A teacher who makes a student conform is creating unnecessary obstacles…More than destroying their students’ chances at learning, they are in fact, destroying their own chances.” “With so many people, we realize––whether consciously or not­­––that the town in which we live doesn’t really need us to survive. Living in such impersonal circumstances, we may simply feel lost in the swarming masses…Because we live in such highly populated, impersonalized cities, it seems most of us lack significance or unique value in the eyes of our community."               

"Are we willing to admit to ourselves that we have, indeed, become alienated from some deeper sense of connection with the planet, each other, and the mysterious life-force that is responsible for our very existence? Or will we continue on our ego-centered paths of myopic fixation, promulgating the aggrandizement of modern society?”   

“Perhaps the whole premise of modern technological society is infused with beliefs and behaviors that are antithetical to the life of the spirit and the innate dignity of human beings, in which the soul’s survival is threatened.” 

“Unfortunately, elevated material reality––or a materialistic relationship to life––also results in an abdication of the soul, which represents our true inner nature. Once this is accomplished, the scene is set for an ongoing psychological crisis.” 

“Most of us would agree that the opposite of love is fear, for where there is fear how can there also be love? Yet in almost every way our society, our media, and our way of life emphasize fear over love, thereby damaging our potential for living compassionately with one another.” “As human beings, when we feel distant and unrelated to one another––through a lack of belonging, caring, familiarity or interrelationship––our normal capacity to function breaks downs, we become psychologically, emotionally, and cognitively distressed. When our interpersonal needs are chronically unmet, we become upset, angry, and depressed. We act out against a world that has not provided what we need––either expressing our anger and discontent at this world that does not appear to care for us, or suffering our disconnection from others in near-suicidal silence.” “Although we habitually ignore the brutality and injustices of the past, of what nearly amounts to genocide, the truth is that the empire we’ve created [and inherited] was built [and maintained] by means of a criminal usurpation of lands, and a bloodthirsty eradication of peoples and cultures who did comparatively nothing wrong to deserve such horrific treatment. How ignorant and arrogant we must be to simply assume that our past [and present] behaviors are somehow magically ‘healed over time.’” 

“In 1994, in an attempt to minimize the possibility of suicide contagion, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published recommendations for the media. The guidelines, while acknowledging that ‘suicide is often newsworthy, and it will probably be reported,’ also emphasized that ‘all parties should understand that a scientific basis exists for concern that news coverage of suicide may contribute to the causation of suicide’ and that ‘public officials and the news media should carefully consider what is to be said and reported regarding suicide.’” 

Well over a decade ago, “transcranial magnetic stimulation, which involves…sending repetitive pulses of high-intensity current to the brain” was reported to have been openly tested on people diagnosed with depression.Night Falls Fast

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