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Sean Healy: Our “globalisation” against yours

Dear Guy Verhofstadt, Prime Minister of Belgium, President of the European Union, On September 26, you wrote an open letter to what you call the “anti-globalisation movement”, in which you question “contradictions” in its arguments, claim it “unwittingly veer[s] dangerously towards extremist, ‘populist’ right-wing views” and even compare it with “religious fanatics who live and Read more…

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Norman Solomon: Killing Them Softly: Starvation And Dollar Bills For Afghan Kids

The Pentagon’s air drops of food parcels and President Bush’s plea for American children to aid Afghan kids with dollar bills will go down in history as two of the most cynical maneuvers of media manipulation in the early 21st century. Many U.S. news outlets have been eager to play along. A New York Times Read more…

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Mark Weisbrot: Trading on Tragedy

Every crisis and tragedy is an opportunity for some, as any ambulance-chasing lawyer can tell you. We expect the Pentagon to lard its already bloated budget, and Attorney General John Ashcroft to chip away at the Bill of Rights, all in the name of the War Against Terrorism. But “Trade Promotion Authority?” That seems like Read more…

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Cynthia Peters: Women’s Patriotic Role

Cynthia Enloe, feminist scholar and author of several books and articles about women and the military, suggests that when a country mobilizes for war, it is useful to ask, “Where are the women?” When we ask, where are the women in the United States, we can learn something about the role of women in U.S. Read more…

Robert Weissman: The Big Bank’s Dirty Little Secret

What is the purpose of law enforcement? To enforce the law, and make public the results. What deterrent effect does law enforcement have if the public is not aware of the results of the law enforcement? Not much. And yet, when it comes to big banks and major financial institutions, the Treasury Department enforces the Read more…

Chris Black: An Impartial Tribunal?

Private justice replacing public justice The indictment of Slobodan Milosevic for alleged war crimes raises important questions about the impartiality and, ultimately, the purpose of the International Criminal Tribunal. For centuries, the independence of judicial bodies has been considered one of the fundamental precepts of the quest for justice. As Lord Hewart stated in 1924, Read more…

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Justin Podur: Globalization, Fox-Style

It never ceases to amaze me, how easily fooled I am by the speeches and rhetoric of politicians. I swear to you I’ve heard speeches by Bill Clinton that have brought me near tears. Before the Quebec City protests against the FTAA I wandered on to the official website of the FTAA. I read their Read more…

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Tim Wise: Some Folks Never Felt Safe: The Truth Behind National Unity

“We stand united,” comes the proclamation from America’s political leaders and national media. “Americans are pulling together like never before,” say still others, in the wake of the horrific attacks of September 11. American flags are popping up everywhere: on lapel pins, car antennae, hastily printed T-shirts, and as inserts in the newspaper; the latter, Read more…

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Judy Rebick: Assault On Liberty

We are not even at war yet and the most important freedom in a democracy, freedom of speech, is already under assault. Sunera Thobani, a private citizen, a university professor and the former leader of the Canadian National Action Committee on the Status of Women is suffering the most ferocious attack in Parliament, and in Read more…

Guest Author: Multi-Focus Or Bust

Anyone that the US goes after these days is bound to be a really bad guy. In the New World Order power is so unbalanced that good guys give in. When Nelson Mandela took office in South Africa global corporations handed him their neo-liberal shopping lists and he just about gave away the store. Perhaps Read more…

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Norman Solomon: Media Spin Revolves Around The Word “terrorist”

During the first two days of this month, CNN’s website displayed an odd little announcement. “There have been false reports that CNN has not used the word ‘terrorist’ to refer to those who attacked the World Trade Center and Pentagon,” the notice said. “In fact, CNN has consistently and repeatedly referred to the attackers and Read more…

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Michael Bronski: The Problem of Gay Soldiers…

Over the past week I have received, and continue to receive, dozens of e-mails relating to gay politics and lives and the Bush’s administration’s response to the attacks on New York and Washington on September 11. The e-mails fall into two groups. The first is a celebration of the “news” – which turns out to Read more…

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Vijay Prashad: Forward Into the Past: US War Aims

The US State Department-Pentagon has a bad record on war aims. During the lead-up to the Gulf War, the Bush administration, Part 1, argued that the US was needed to liberate Kuwait. The invasion of a state of 2.2 million people, in which only 28% earned the right to citizenship and a part of the Read more…

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Edward Herman: ANTITERRORISM AS A COVER FOR TERRORISM

During the Cold War the United States supported a string of terror states, from the immediate post-World War backing given Thailand dictator Phibun Songkhram, “the first pro-Axis dictator to regain power after the war,” to its support of Suharto, Marcos, Mobutu, Diem, Duvalier, Trujillo, Somoza, and a string of murderous military regimes in Latin America. Read more…

Sean Healy: No technofix for the Third World

Humans can make all kinds of nifty things – the axe, the wheel, the spinning jenny, the aeroplane, the pill, the Pentium III, vanilla ice cream – and can achieve all sorts of magical things with them. But these inventions haven’t freed the societies which invented them. For poverty, for inequality, for subjugation there has Read more…

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Vandana Shiva: Solidarity Against All Forms of Terrorism

18th September was the day for solidarity with victims of the September 11th terrorist attack on the U.S. I joined the millions to observe two minutes silence at 10:30 a.m. for those who lost their lives in the assault on the World Trade Centre and the Pentagon. But I also thought of the millions who Read more…

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George Monbiot: Genocide or Peace

Peace has been declared before the war has begun. Those who advocated the obliteration of Kabul and Baghdad have retreated in the face of insuperable complexity. Many of those who argued against aggression have relaxed as the threat of carpet bombing or nuclear strikes has lifted. Most people now appear to agree that attacking a Read more…

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Scott Burchill: The US, Indonesia, and Terror

In a bid to build its coalition for a war against terrorism, the United States has demonstrated that it is keen to have on side the world’s biggest Islamic nation, Indonesia. Support from Indonesia, an ally of the United States from the late 1960s until September 1999, was being sought by the US in any Read more…

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Stephen R. Shalom: September 11 And Its Aftermath

Michael Albert and Stephen R. Shalom We are writing this on September 17, less than a week after the horrific terrorist attacks against the United States. We are still dealing with our grief and trauma and we are still profoundly moved by the many acts of heroism, generosity, and solidarity that have taken place. Some Read more…

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David Barsamian: An interview with Naomi Klein & Avi Lewis

David Barsamian Naomi Klein is a columnist for Canada’s Globe and Mail and author of No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies. Avi Lewis is host of a one-hour talk show called “CounterSpin” on CBC-TV. DAVID BARSAMIAN: Give people below the 49th parallel, a sense of what’s going on in Canadian media. NAOMI KLEIN: Read more…

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David Barsamian: Immigration and Racism

David Barsamian Cathi Tactaquin is a founder and director of the Oakland-based National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, an alliance of grassroots, community, labor, and faith organizations. Miriam Ching Louie, of the Berkeley-based Women of Color Resource Center, is the author of Sweatshop Warriors: Immigrant Women Workers Take on the Global Factory, published by Read more…

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Bill Berkowitz: The National Endowment for Democracy

Bill Berkowitz Until I read an item at Media- Transparency.org about the election of former Congress- person Vin Weber as chair of its Board, I didn’t realize the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) was still in business. Weber, who represented his Minnesota district from 1980 through 1992, is currently the managing partner at the consulting Read more…

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Michael Bronski: Andrew Sullivan and the Politics of Privacy

Michael Bronski The news that Andrew Sullivan, the openly gay, HIV-positive, conservative, devoutly Catholic, former editor of the New Republic (where he is still a contributing editor) and frequent columnist for the New York Times Magazine, had admitted to cruising gay websites for sex was delicious. The charge that Sullivan, who has long chastised gay Read more…

Sandy Carter: Talking About Myths, Heroes, And Scoundrels

Carter Paul Lassier’s first novel, Last Refuge of Scoundrels (Warner Books) takes readers on a wild, rollicking, irreverent tour of the American Revolution. Through the voice of John Lawrence, a naive young aide-de-camp to George Washington, and the daring exploits of an unsung underground leader named Deborah Simpson, we meet our Founding Fathers, stripped of Read more…

Nic Paget-clarke: From Missouri To New Zealand

Paget-Clarke In February of this year, Bill Christison, the president of both the National Family Farm Coalition and the Missouri Rural Crisis Center, traveled to New Zealand to testify before that country’s Royal Commission on Genetic Modification. He spoke as a member of an international panel assembled by Greenpeace New Zealand. His contribution revealed the Read more…

Miriam ching yoon Louie: none

Ching Yoon Louie Cambridge: South End Press, 2001 Review by Mickey Ellinger and Sharon Martinas Shoppers stared as we picketed Jessica McClintock’s San Francisco boutique. About half of us were young white people in jeans and sweatshirts, about half Chinese women in their 30s and 40s, some children, a few Asian men, a few young Read more…

Wayne Grytting: Philip Morris Sees the Light

Wayne Grytting After decades of sticking their heads in the sand about the hazards of tobacco, Philip Morris has found a new tactic—promoting the benefits to society of premature deaths from smoking. A study produced for them by Arthur D. Little, one of the “foremost management consulting firms,” found the early deaths of smokers has Read more…

Leonard Innes: Brewing Misery

Leonard Innes If you’ve bought a cup of coffee lately, you probably wouldn’t be surprised to hear that the big coffee corporations who dominate the market are making record profits. It seems there’s a Starbucks in every shopping area and the cost of a cup of coffee is almost the equivalent of a day’s wage Read more…

James Petras: Neomercantilist Empire in Latin America, Part 2

James Petras Confronted by stiff competition and negative trade balances with Asia and Europe, the Bush adminis- tration has decided to consolidate and deepen its control over Latin America. Under Clinton, Washington spread the empire over the four corners of the world, U.S. multi-national corporations gained ascendancy, but the U.S. “national economy”—the exports and imports Read more…

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Justin Podur: A Way Out for Colombia

Justin Podur Who in the U.S. benefits from fumigating Colombians?” the man asked me pointedly in the crowded community hall in a paramilitary-controlled part of Putumayo. Putumayo is a southern department of Colombia where the guerrilla insurgency is strong, where much coca is grown, where paramilitary massacres, disappearances, and assassinations are frequent, and where Plan Read more…

Andrew Pollack: ICFTU Global Day of Action on November 9

Andrew Pollack The leaders of the world’s biggest union body, the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU), have issued a call for action which could dramatically transform the movement against capitalist globalization. In a press release dated July 19, the ICFTU announced that “trade union leaders from around the world, meeting in a special Read more…

W. michael byrd and linda a. Clayton: none

Michael Byrd and Linda A. Clayton New York, NY, Routledge, 2000; 588 pp., with illus. Review by John Price In the world’s richest society—boasting the best medical technology on the planet—the question begs asking: Why are Black folks in such poor health? An American Health Dilemma examines this oft-ignored question by probing into the history Read more…

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Paul Street: The White Fairness Understanding Gap

Paul Street Educators, policy-makers, activists, and academics regularly decry and claim to offer solutions to the problem that Blacks tend to score significantly lower than whites on standardized academic achievement tests. It is interesting, then, to read the results of a survey conducted last Spring by the Washington Post, the Henry J. Kaiser Foundation, and Read more…

Ted Wilkinson: Conspiracy in New Hampshire

Ted Wilkinson Once a favorite tool of the Justice Department during the Nixon administration, the federal Conspiracy Statute has resurfaced in a sinister new form and in a most unlikely place: the conservative countryside of southwestern New Hampshire. In the solidly Republican town of Milford, on the morning of December 22, 2000, heavily-armed agents of Read more…

Michael a. de Yoanna: Ground Zero for Columbus Day

Michael A. de Yoanna & Terje Langeland This October, a conflict rooted in more than 500 years of American history will once again rear its head in Denver, Colorado. As Italian-Americans prepare to march in honor of Christopher Columbus, American Indians and their supporters, including anti-globalization activists, plan to confront the parade. For Italian-Americans and Read more…

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Nikos Raptis: Of Pyramids and Skyscrapers

The “Great Pyramid” was built in 2,700 B.C. in Egypt. “The established theory holds that the pyramids were constructed with stone blocks carved at various quarries and transported to the site of the pyramids. It is estimated that it took 20 years to build the Great Pyramid and that each year 100,000 men were needed Read more…

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Michael Albert: Albert Interviews Chomsky

I sent six questions to Noam Chomsky. His answers, by email, are below. (1) There has been an immense movement of troops and extreme use of military rhetoric, up to comments about terminating governments, etc. Yet, to many people there appears to be considerable restraint…what happened?   From the first days after the attack, the Read more…

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Michael Albert: What’s Going On?

The U.S. response to September 11 seeks to benefit elites in the U.S., and, to a lesser degree, around the world. There are various goals. –> Destroy the bin Laden network –> Topple the Taliban –> Build a coalition fighting selected terrorists internationally in exchange for trade and foreign aid benefits and the right of Read more…

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Jeremy Brecher: Now, More Than Ever: A Global Movement for Global Justice

In the months before September 11, the Bush Administration undermined one effort after another to address world problems on an international basis. It skipped out on the Kyoto Protocol on global warming, scuttled efforts to control biological weapons, refused to support a war crimes tribunal, withdrew from efforts to limit nuclear proliferation, and announced withdrawal Read more…

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Marta Russell: Waxman, Nursing Home “Reform” and Progressive Jobs

While the AFL-CIO has alarmed environmental and other activists by throwing its support behind big oil and Bush’s backwards energy policy, Henry Waxman has alarmed disability activists by throwing his support behind the nursing home industry and perpetuating the nation’s outmoded long term care policy, namely institutionalization. There have been a slew of reports lately Read more…

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Edward Herman: “The Price Is Worth It”

Try to imagine how the mainstream U.S. media and intellectuals would respond to the disclosure that at an early planning meeting of the terrorists responsible for the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon, the question had come up about whether the “collateral damage” of prospectively thousands of dead civilians wouldn’t be excessive, but Read more…

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Russell Mokhiber: The Wartime Opportunists

Make way for the wartime opportunists. Corporate interests and their proxies are looking to exploit the September 11 tragedy to advance a self-serving agenda that has nothing to do with national security and everything to do with corporate profits and dangerous ideologies. Fast track and the Free Trade Area of the Americas. A corporate tax Read more…

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Robert Fisk: How can the US bomb

I watch these events with incredulity, not least because I was a witness to the Russian invasion and occupation. How they fought for us, those Afghans, how they believed our word. How they trusted President Carter when he promised the West’s support. I even met the CIA spook in Peshawar, brandishing the identity papers of Read more…

Guest Author: How can the US bomb this tragic people?

We are witnessing this weekend one of the most epic events since the Second World War, certainly since Vietnam. I am not talking about the ruins of the World Trade Centre in New York and the grotesque physical scenes which we watched on 11 September, an atrocity which I described last week as a crime Read more…

Guest Author: Will Tears Ever Stop

I can’t help crying. As soon as I see a person on TV telling the heart-rendering story of the tragic fate of their loved-one in the World Trade Center disaster, I can’t control my tears. But then I wonder why didn’t I cry when our troops wiped out some 5,000 poor people in Panama’s El Read more…

Guest Author: The Theatre of Good and Evil

In the struggle of Good against Evil, it’s always the people who get killed. The terrorists killed workers of 50 countries in NYC and DC, in the name of Good against Evil. And in the name of Good against Evil President Bush has promised vengeance: “We will eliminate Evil from the world”, he announced. Eliminate Read more…

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Stephen R. Shalom: The United States and Middle East: Why Do “They” Hate Us?

(Revised, 22 Sept. 2001) The list below presents some specific incidents of U.S. policy in the Middle East. The list minimizes the grievances against the United States in the region because it excludes more generalized long standing policies, such as U.S. backing for authoritarian regimes (arming Saudi Arabia, training the secret police in Iran under Read more…

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Michael Albert: Peace Movement Prospects

September 11 went well beyond tragic. Worse is possible. Much better is also possible. And to achieve better is why activists need to not only mourn, but also to educate and organize. But many people I encounter doubt peace movement prospects. I find this wrong for two reasons. One, doubting prospects wastes time. Even when Read more…

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Noam Chomsky: Composite Interview 2

1. How do you see the media coverage of this event? Is there a parallel to the Gulf War in “manufacturing consent?” Media coverage is not quite as uniform as Europeans seem to believe, perhaps because they are keeping to the NYT, NPR, TV, and so on. Even the NYT conceded, this morning, that attitudes Read more…

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Michael Albert: Neoclassical Micro And Macro Economics–Science Or Silliness?

BY ITS own claims economics is the most scientific "social science." Yet non-economist critics such as E.F. Schumacher tell us that "to produce [economic] figures about the unknown, the current method is to make a guess about something or other–called an assumption–and to derive an estimate from it by subtle calculation. The estimate is then Read more…

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