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Vandana Shiva: Who Won, Who Lost: The Victory of the Agribusiness in the WTO Framework Agreement

On 16th August, Commerce Minister Kamal Nath informed the Rajya Sabha that India had made significant gains in the recently negotiated Framework Agreement in Geneva on the Doha Work Programme. The Commerce Minister was particularly proud of his success in the Agriculture Negotiations which had been the reason for the collapse of the Cancun Ministerial. Read more…

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George Monbiot: A Thousand Dusty Codicils

If we have learnt anything over the past 18 months it is this: that the first rule of politics – power must never be trusted – still applies. The government will neither regulate itself nor be regulated by the institutions which surround it. Parliament chose to believe a string of obvious lies. The media repeated Read more…

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John Pilger: Bush Versus Kerry: The Fake Debate

On 6 May last, the US House of Representatives passed a resolution which,in effect, authorised a “pre-emptive” attack on Iran. The vote was 376/3. Undeterred by the accelerating disaster in Iraq, Republicans and Democrats,wrote one commentator, “once again joined hands to assert the responsibilities of American power.” The joining of hands across America’s illusory political Read more…

Paul Hunt: WTO Democracy

The World Trade Organization has emerged as one of the most powerful bureaucracies in the world. The WTO, through its nefarious treaties and agreements, lays rules for governments to follow. These rules are set to favor the rich global powers-that-be and are fundamentally against democratic principles. Indeed, the WTO was organised for the specific purpose Read more…

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Devinder Sharma: WTO Tricks

After a ‘truly historic’ agreement, it is now an embarrassing wake-up call for the developing countries. The big boys have done it again. This time, they have successfully managed to apply the dope trick on the developing countries – putting them in a hall of shame for letting the rich and industrialized countries not only Read more…

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David Bacon: Black/Migrant Rivalry for Jobs Can Be Eased

Blacks, Latinos and labor are three of the most stalwart constituencies in Democratic Party politics. But the interests of the groups have increasingly brought them into conflict. Take what happened in Los Angeles during the early 1980s. Up until that time, the janitors who cleaned offices tended to be African American, and many of those Read more…

Jonhatan Steele: Sociologists Are Moving Left

In the ocean-fed air and mild August sunshine of America’s most beautiful city, optimism flows easy. But the real mood-lift these past few days was in the windowless conference rooms of two downtown mega-hotels. More than 5,000 American sociologists, plus a few foreign scholars, held their largest and, many said, most vibrant annual convention for Read more…

Jonah Gindin: Deepening the Bolivarian Revolution

On Sunday, August 15th Venezuela lined up to vote.  Beginning as early as 3am, Venezuelans camped outside of schools and public buildings, waiting hours to cast their vote in a referendum to decide not only the future of their controversial President Hugo Chávez, but also of the Bolivarian revolution that he has spearheaded.  Despite the Read more…

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Mike Davis: The Ghost Shirts

September 1, 1934: Millions of cotton spindles stopped spinning. Across the Southern Piedmont, mill whistles blew but workers didn’t come to work. The most exploited industrial workforce in the United States — the “lint heads” of the Carolinas, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama — was on strike.   As mill owners appealed frantically for injunctions, tear Read more…

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Stan Karp: Taming the Beast

What’s the right funding level for a bad law? Almost from the day Congress passed the No Child Left Behind act (NCLB), there have been contentious debates about its funding levels. But while these debates have raised significant issues about what constitutes “full funding” for NCLB, they have generally avoided the fact that without drastic Read more…

Sam Bahour: De-development, Israeli Style

Faced with the lopsided Oslo Peace Accords, Palestinians attempted to overcome tremendous odds over the last ten years to sow the seeds of a modern Palestinian economy.  However, Israel had different plans, namely to manipulate the uneven balance of power to eliminate any possibility for Palestinian self-sufficiency and the emergence of a Palestinian state.  Mixing Read more…

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Arundhati Roy: Tide? Or Ivory Snow?

Transcript of full speech by Arundhati Roy in San Francisco, California on August 16th, 2004. Copyright 2004 Arundhati Roy. For permission to reprint contact [email protected] I’ve been asked to speak about “Public Power in the Age of Empire.” I’m not used to doing as I’m told, but by happy coincidence, it’s exactly what I’d like Read more…

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Ward Churchill: Resistance to War, Occupation, and Empire

On Sunday, August 8, Ward Churchill was the keynote speaker at the 15th annual Under the Volcano: Festival of Art and Social Change, Celebrating Peoples Resistance to War, Occupation and Empire, Vancouver, British Columbia. Siyo, oseeju. Hello my relatives, it’s good to see you here. And isn’t here a beautiful place, and isn’t this a Read more…

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Uri Avnery: A Very Special Kind of War

“For all I care, they can starve to death!” announced Tzahi Hanegbi, after Palestinian prisoners declared an open-ended hunger strike against prison conditions. Thus the Minister for Internal Security added another memorable phrase to the lexicon of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Hanegbi became famous (or infamous) for the first time when, as a student activist, he Read more…

Samer Elatrash: The Iraqi Olympians

Last year’s killings of Uday and Qusay Hussein in a gunfight with US soldiers came as good news to many Iraqis. The Hussein brothers were ruthless brutes. There were few Iraqis who mourned them There were just about as many reasons to feel relieved by their deaths as there were Iraqis who lost a loved Read more…

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Saul Landau: God and Botox

“Nature is a woman, with lots of wrinkles.” — Anonymous “In 2001, more than 1.6 million people received Botox injections, an increase of 46 percent over the previous year. More popular than breast enhancement surgery and a potential blockbuster, Botox is regarded by some as the ultimate fountain of youth. Botox injections are the fastest-growing Read more…

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Norman Solomon: From Attica to Abu Ghraib — and a Prison Near You

A recent obituary in the New York Times told about Frank Smith, “who as an inmate leader at Attica prison was tortured by officers in the aftermath of the prisoner uprising of 1971 and then spent a quarter century successfully fighting for legal damages.” Working as a paralegal after his release, Smith was a pivotal Read more…

Satya Sagar: India’s Intifada

It is not Fallujah, Palestine or even Kashmir but only a small province in the north-east of India. But there is no doubt that what the people of Manipur are staging right now is a full-scale intifada against the atrocities of an occupying army. The immediate target of their ire is one of the world’s Read more…

Mike Whitney: Afghanistan Down The Memory Hole

Donald Rumsfeld’s trip to Afghanistan barely produced a yawn from a disinterested American media. America’s front pages are too busy sorting through every excruciating detail of John Kerry’s charge up the Mekong Delta some 30 years ago. (Did you know that John Kerry served in Viet Nam?) Rumsfeld’s visit was buried on page 14A next Read more…

Lisa Ashkenaz croke: New Iraqi Council Chosen in Undemocratic Assembly

In what had been touted as Iraq’s first democratic election, last week’s tumultuous Iraqi National Conference closed with a four-judge panel selecting a list of candidates for the Interim National Council, leaving the hundreds of delegates invited to the conference to approve the decision with only a show of hands. In the end, the same Read more…

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Tom Engelhardt: Unidentified Flying Words (UFWs) and other strange sightings

In the last couple of weeks, if you weren’t ducking UFWs (Unidentified Flying Words), perhaps you were wishing you could be transported to Roswell, New Mexico, or Nevada’s infamous Area 51 where the strangest thing you might run into would be well-preserved, if spindly, alien bodies of a sort seen too regularly in the movies Read more…

Isabel Hilton: Colombia’s Pipeline Paid For In Blood & Money

If peace ever comes to Colombia after decades of civil war, it will come too late for three citizens of the oil-rich north-east region of Arauca, on the border with Venezuela. They were murdered by the army on August 5. The men were all trade unionists, and their killings bring to 30 the number of Read more…

Graciela Monteagudo: From Trotsky to Puppets

Graciela Monteagudo is an Argentinean organizer,   street heater maker and performer who has coordinated   puppet and street theater actions as part of protests   in Buenos Aires, Puerto Rico and throughout the US   and Canada, against the World Economic Forum, the   School of the Americas and the G8. She also works Read more…

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Russell Mokhiber: National Geographic Kids Under the Corporate Thumb

Russell Mokhiber and Robert Weissman We picked up the recent issue of National Geographic magazine. On the cover was an overweight person and the headline read, “Why Are We So Fat?” What, you may ask, has this to do with geography? Well, let’s say you mapped all of the junk food outlets in the United Read more…

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David Edwards: Animal Rights – The Case For Kindness

Writing in the Guardian, Peter Singer, a leading figure in the animal rights movement, describes the confrontation between animal rights activists and researchers experimenting on animals: "This situation has arisen, in part, because the animal research community holds an ethical view that the animal movement rejects. That view is, in essence, that animals are things Read more…

Jonah Gindin: Beyond Populism: Venezuela and the International Left

All over the world, the international Left — including the global social justice movement — is peering sceptically at Venezuela, unsure of what to make of President Hugo Chavez’ alleged democratic revolution. Is Chavez the next Allende? Is the ‘Bolivarian revolution’ really revolutionary? Is it anti-capitalist? Or does he merely represent another chimera in a Read more…

Joel Wendland: Still Not Getting By In Bush’s America

According to recent statistics provided by the U.S. Census Bureau, the gap between the rich and poor since 1967 has grown by 75 percent. While the average total household income for families in the bottom 20 percent has grown by $2,500 since 1967, the top 20 percent have seen their incomes soar by about $62,000. Read more…

Mike Whitney: Putting To Rest The “few Bad Apples” Theory

No need to inquire about co-payments at Abu Ghraib prison facility. Rummy’s HMO will cover the whole thing. And, there’s no sense in worrying about those nagging medical malpractice suits either. American doctors can pursue their own diverse inclinations without inhibition or fear of reprisal. The Pentagon now provides cover for dilettantes in the ancient Read more…

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Brian Dominick: U.S. Forces Bombard Holy Site After Al-Sadr Offers to Leave

Despite Muqtada Al-Sadr’s attempt to accept demands that his Mehdi Army depart from the Imam Ali Shrine and engage peacefully in the Iraqi political process, including an apparent move to hand the shrine over to top Shi’ite clerics, the assault on Mehdi forces intensified overnight and into Friday morning. US forces bombarded Mehdi militia positions Read more…

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Brian Dominick: Medics Involved In Torture At Abu Ghraib

When the findings of the latest US Army investigation into the Abu Ghraib torture scandal are reported to Congress next week, no one of higher rank than colonel is expected to be named as directly responsible for the systemic abuses uncovered in the prison just outside Baghdad. Meanwhile, according to charges made by an ethicist Read more…

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Norman Solomon: How the News Media Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love Rumsfeld

The nation’s top dog of war is frisky again. Donald Rumsfeld has returned to high visibility — after a couple of months in the media doghouse following revelations about torture at the Abu Ghraib prison — now openly romancing the journalistic pack with his inimitable style of tough love as he growls and romps across Read more…

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Chris Spannos: Architecture of the New Society

Every city is a deeply interconnected web of spatial designs and patterns. From the urban to the suburban, our built environment is carved out into commercial and residential areas. Buildings, parking lots, garages and gas stations are built into streets, freeways, shopping malls, industrial parks and transit routs. Apartments, houses, yards and sidewalks all lead Read more…

Mike Whitney: Guantanamo Mock Trials

The basic purpose of the Law is to protect the individual from the violence of the state. Judges who refuse to defend this fundamental principle must be removed from the bench. Free societies simply cease to exist beneath the shadow of arbitrary imprisonment. When the Supreme Court finally ruled on the Yasir Hamdi case, America’s Read more…

Charles Demers: Non-violence In The Palestinian Arsenal

The well-worn maxim that “What is old is new again” has finally moved beyond the realm of vintage t-shirts, vinyl fetishists and Athenian Olympiads and into the heady stuff of North-South geopolitics. For years, discussions of “imperialism” and “colonialism” have been prefixed by the three-letter disclaimer “neo”; no more is that the case. An increasingly Read more…

Romi Mahajan: Coming Full Circle

The advertisement shocked me when I saw it; I recoiled. Luckily it is perfect fodder for an article attempting to illustrate how very little has indeed changed with regard to the suzerainty of one set of peoples over others. So I’ll use it cheaply as a springboard for an analysis of Empire and some of Read more…

Sharon Smith: Profits Come Before Patients

RECENT OPINION polls show that Americans regard the pharmaceutical industry with roughly the same level of contempt as Big Tobacco. This comparison, between the international cartel of life-saving drugs and the conglomerate of killer tobacco, is remarkably astute: Both are murderers. Big Pharma deliberately withheld access to life-saving drugs to the populations of poor countries Read more…

Mordechai Vanunu: Israel’s Nuclear Weapons

Mordechai Vanunu worked as a nuclear technician at Dimona, Israel’s secret nuclear installation from 1976 to 1985. He worked there at a time when Israel was insisting it would not be the first to introduce nuclear weapons to the Middle East. What Vanunu discovered is that Israel had secretly developed an extensive nuclear program, hiding Read more…

Madeleine Baran: AFL-CIO Snubs Million Worker March

As union activists prepare for the October Million Worker March in Washington, DC, the AFL-CIO continues to distance itself from the event, exacerbating tensions between organizers who want to demonstrate for major economic reforms and those who want to focus on electoral politics. A diverse group of union leaders and rank-and-file members are organizing the Read more…

Lisa Taraki: Boycotting the Israeli Academy

Calls for the boycott of Israeli academic institutions have generated a great deal of controversy in some quarters, notably among Israeli academics and their supporters in Europe and the United States. The Palestinian voice, the voice of the Palestinian academy and of Palestinian public intellectuals, has not been heard in the raging debates about the Read more…

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Jonathan Schell: The empire that fell as it rose

[Tom Engelhardt: Had anyone in Washington bothered to read Jonathan Schell’s prophetic — or perhaps I should just say, historically on the mark — book The Unconquerable World, Iraq could not have happened and all the dreams of the neocons, hatched in the claustrophobic confines of right-wing think tanks and the corridors of power in Read more…

Justin Felux: Killers and Kangaroo Courts

Many people in Latin America and around the world have spent the past several days celebrating. On Sunday, the poor people of Venezuela crushed an attempted electoral coup d’état by that country’s ruling elite. The policies of President Hugo Chavez and the Bolivarian movement received yet another mandate, this one so strong that even Jimmy Read more…

Toni Solo: After the Venezuela Referendum

For the Venezuelan government the result of the recall referendum last Sunday was a triumphant validation of its legitimacy, its policies and its President, Hugo Chavez. It amounts to an electoral Dien Bien Phu (1) for the United States and its allies who have worked determinedly to destabilize Venezuela’s political life in almost every conceivable Read more…

Jim Wallis: Hearts & Minds Class Warfare

I did a right-wing talk show the other night on Fox News. Whenever you mention poverty in a venue like that, they scream that you’re engaging in class warfare and promptly declare war on you. I’ve decided that the right wing is correct on this: There is a class war, but they and their political Read more…

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Kim Scipes: International Income Inequality: Whither the United States?

We hear ad nauseum from the mainstream media, and particularly the business-focused press, that the United States has the most productive economy on the face of the Earth. Yet there is almost never any discussion about how equally or unequally the income generated from that productivity is distributed across members of our society. Income inequality Read more…

Lisa Ashkenaz croke: Najaf Prompts Outrage, Talk of Secession Among Iraqi Politicians

From the disrupted Iraqi National Conference in Baghdad to the low-key threat of secession from Shi’ite leaders in Southern Iraq, the entire country’s future may be determined by events in the holy city of Najaf. The National Conference, where 1,300 Iraqi delegates were to meet for three days and elect the 100-member National Council, was Read more…

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Tom Engelhardt: The imperfect media storm or George Bush and the Temple of Doom

Quote of the week: The President on Larry King Live finally puts to rest any doubts you had about what he was doing for those 7 minutes in a Florida classroom on September 11, 2001: “Well, I had just been told by [Chief of Staff] Andrew Card that America was under attack. And I was Read more…

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Tom Engelhardt: What do we call the enemy?

Last week, through a front-page reconsideration of its Iraq reporting written by media columnist Howard Kurtz (The Post on WMDs: An Inside Story, 8/12/04) the Washington Post finally hung out a piece or two of its dirty laundry. This comes three months after the New York Times buried its Iraq mea culpa on page 10 Read more…

Guest Author: Chavez Wins Big and the Opposition Refuses to Recognize the Obvious

Chavez won and he won big. According to preliminary results, which have been ratified by all international observers, the lead over the opposition was about 15% – 57% in favor of Chavez and 43% against. Of course, the opposition, as a result of being misled by some of their leadership, is convinced that Chavez managed Read more…

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Saul Landau: Transfer Of Power, Sort Of — Now And Then

“The government is the potent omnipresent teacher. For good or ill it teaches the whole people by its example. Crime is contagious. If the government becomes a lawbreaker, it breeds contempt for law; it invites every man to become a law unto himself; it invites anarchy.” Justice Louis D. Brandeis, Olmstead v. United States, 1928 Read more…

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Andre Vltchek: Defending Venezuela

Those of us who lived and worked in Latin America were glued to the television sets and computer monitors, following an outcome of referendum in Venezuela, organized by the right wing opposition supported by the United States. Those of us who believe in progress, decency and equality, rejoiced. Hugo Chavez, President and reformist, survived again, Read more…

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