Category: Review

Thomas I. Palley: Deeper Reflections on Thomas Piketty’s “Capital”

Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century is a six hundred and eighty-five page tome that definitively characterizes the empirical pattern of income and wealth inequality in capitalist economies

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Dick Meister: ‘”Cesar Chavez” — A Film That Tells It Like It Really Was

Anyone hoping to understand the long, fierce struggle to win a decent life for the highly exploited men and women who harvest our fruits and vegetables should not miss the recently released film, “Cesar Chavez”

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Paul Street: Avoiding the Capitalist Apocalypse

A look at Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty’

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Paul Krugman: Why We’re in a New Gilded Age

Review of Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty

Freeman Dyson: The Case for Blunders

Review of Brilliant Blunders: From Darwin to Einstein—Colossal Mistakes by Great Scientists That Changed Our Understanding of Life and the Universe by Mario Livio

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Robert Jensen: Barking Dogs and Sinking Ships

Reviewing The Watchdog That Didn’t Bark: The Financial Crisis and the Disappearance of Investigative Journalism

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Edward Herman: A Review of Manufactured Crisis

Journalist-scholar Gareth Porter has published another fine book on U.S. aggression, Manufactured Crisis: The Untold Story of the Iran Nuclear Scare, which follows in the footsteps of his 2005 study, The Perils of Dominance.

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Louis Proyect: Is a Real Revolution Possible in the Arab World?

At first blush, the term “Arab Winter” makes sense given the restoration of military rule in Egypt, Syria’s descent into sectarian chaos, and Libya’s coming apart at the seams. Can a case be made for guarded optimism, however? If so, then there is probably nobody more qualified to make it than Gilbert Achcar, the preeminent Read more…

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Stephen R. Shalom: Greco on Chomsky

A look at Chomsky’s Challenge to American Power, by Anthony F. Greco

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Neve Gordon: Baghdad Central

Center-staging the calamities of collaboration, Elliott Colla’s noir thriller exposes the moral and strategic failures of military occupation

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