Category: Labor

Pablo Pozzi: Labor Repression in Argentina

On Monday, February 16, 1998, in Usuhuaia, the Argentina’s southernmost city in Tierra del Fuego, the courts finally declared the innocence of steelworker leader Oscar Martinez. Accused of "inciting to violence", Martinez had been blamed by the government for the April 1995 repression of a strike that resulted in one steelworker dead and dozens wounded. Read more…

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David Bacon: Liverpool Dockers

Liverpool was once the strongest union port in Britain, a country where all dockworkers were unionized for over 100 years. Under past Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, however, British ports were turned over to private companies. Dockworkers, who had been public employees, then became employees of individual private employers. In the process, recognition was withdrawn from Read more…

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David Bacon: Union Wins Election At Ucsf Stanford Healthcare

  When the polling began at the two big, state-of-the-art hospitals on the Stanford University campus in Palo Alto, over 1,000 workers on dozens of work schedules were ready to vote on whether or not to join a union. Many of them had tried before–this was the latest of multiple attempts made over the last Read more…

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David Bacon: title(“Fraud In Oakland’s Garbage Sweatshop”)

When 70 workers walked out of a west Oakland recycling facility August 21, they simply wanted a raise. But the increasingly bitter East Bay strike uncovered, not just abusive working conditions and poverty wages, but de facto municipal sanction of a garbage-sorting sweatshop, operated for years in violation of its own city contract.  As the Read more…

Tom Gallagher: Everybody Loved It, But…

  Everyone was telling us, ‘You’re golden’,” Los Angeles Manufacturing Action Project (LAMAP) founder Peter Olney recalls. In 1995 the organization did seem charmed, its success seemingly guaranteed by its arrival at precisely the moment the American labor movement was waking from a half-century nap.                The AFL-CIO was having the first open presidential race Read more…

Jim Crotty: Labor Resistance in Korea

  Labor Resistance in Korea By Jim Crotty & Gary Dymski     Since our article in the July-August issue, Asia has fallen into a self-reinforcing regional collapse. It may be at the edge of a meltdown. East and Southeast Asia are highly integrated economically. Falling Asian demand has hurt Japanese exports and staggered its ailing banking Read more…

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David Bacon: The GM Strike

The GM Strike By David Bacon Ending the strike of two auto parts plants near Detroit—a process which used to take just a few days—has instead lasted weeks. But delay and stubborn conflict is not the most unique factor marking this strike. It’s the fact that General Motors strikers have been forced to confront the Read more…

James Crotty: The Korean Struggle

& Gary Dymski Just a few months after getting a clean bill of economic health from the OECD in mid 1997, South Korea’s economy plunged into a foreign exchange crisis. By December the Korean government had signed a loan agreement with the IMF. The severity of its terms were unprecedented. Koreans quickly spread the bitter Read more…

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Edward Herman: The U.S. Jobs Miracle

  In both Europe and the United States, the substantial growth in U.S. jobs over the past several decades has been repeatedly cited in support of the view that a “flexible” labor market is the solution to the problem of unemployment that has beset the West once again. “Flexible” is a euphemism for “unorganized and Read more…

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Jeremy Brecher: Labor Update: Organizing the New Workforce

Jeremy Brecher   Traditionally, the majority of American union members have been blue-collar white males. Over the past quarter-century, this group became a smaller and smaller minority in the workforce, while other groups—sometimes dubbed “the new workforce”—grew as a percentage of organized and unorganized workers. The proportion of workers who were women started to grow Read more…

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