Category: Weapons & Disarmament

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Mark Selden: Nagasaki 1945: While Independents Were Scorned, Embed Won Pulitzer

Nagasaki, 1945: Thirty days after the first atomic bomb people were still dying, mysteriously and horribly   Sixty years after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, some of the first reportage of the deadly impact of radiation — before the term had come into popular use — has reemerged from behind the veil of Read more…

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Herbert P. Bix: Japan’s Surrender Decision and the Monarchy:

A producer for the Korean Broadcasting System, which is doing a special program commemorating August 15, 1945, recently asked me why Japan’s ruling elites rejected the Potsdam Declaration. "What issue most impeded their decision to surrender?" he inquired. "Shouldn’t they have cared more for the safety of their own people after the war had long Read more…

Bill Witherup: REFLECTIONS ON THE SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE TRINITY TEST

July 16, 2005, will be the sixtieth anniversary of the plutonium-fueled atomic bomb, tested at White Sands, New Mexico. On July 15th and 16th the Los Alamos Study Group, a nuclear-weapons watchdog, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, will hold poetry readings and a silent auction in Santa Fe and Albuquerque. John Bradley, a fellow poet, Read more…

Zia Mian: Lingering Shadows

Recent weeks have seen many events commemorating the 60th anniversary of the defeat of Nazi Germany in the second world war. There has been little or no discussion of some of the most important and enduring legacies of that war that have cast a long shadow ever since. Nationalism, industrial production, the bureaucratic state, and Read more…

Yuki Tanaka: Firebombing and Atom Bombing

The firebombing of Tokyo, or for that matter the bombing of any city, whether it be Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Dresden or London, cannot be fully comprehended unless it is examined in the context of the history of indiscriminate bombing throughout the twentieth century.   Indiscriminate bombing of civilians during major warfare was first conducted by both Read more…

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Tom Engelhardt: Nuclear Illusions

On August 6, 1945, the day that was to prove the blindingly bright dawn of the atomic age, Little Boy, a 9,700 pound baby with the look of “an elongated trash can with fins,” had already been loaded into the specially prepared bomb bay of a B-29. The night before, in large letters, mission commander Read more…

Greg Mitchell: Weapons of Mass Destruction, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the Atomic Testing Museum

Part I   April 23 — Judith Miller has a WMD problem. She sees them where they don’t exist. Where they did exist she tells only half the story.   Her prominent articles for The New York Times in 2002 and 2003 about alleged weapons of mass destruction in Iraq helped pave the way for Read more…

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David Peterson: The Nuclear-Weapon State of Israel

Every five years, the States Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons hold a formal and extensive review of the Treaty’s successes and failures since the last formal Review, all with an eye toward identifying the Treaty’s strengths and weakensses, and strengthening it overall. (At least one can hope.) The 2005 Review Read more…

Christine Girardin: The Enola Gay in History and Memory

[Japan Focus introduction: With the 60th anniversary of the atomic bombings fast approaching, commemorative events and symposia are being planned across the globe in places as diverse, yet symbolically significant, as Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Tinian, London, Tokyo, Washington, and Los Alamos. While forthcoming books by historians Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, Gerard DeGroot, and Martin Sherwin and Kai Bird Read more…

Roger Pulvers: The Human Condition after Hiroshima: the world of Inoue Hisashi

What could be said for the human being after Nanking, Dresden, Auschwitz, Hiroshima and Nagasaki? Whatever the motivation, this is what we did to each other, and continue to do to this very hour. How can a writer write about goodness when people of all nations, autocratic or democratic, take up murder and torture with Read more…

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