Category: Coups

avatar
E. Wayne Ross: The Spectacle of Standards & Summits

  In 1989, President Bush called the nation’s governors together for the first national education summit. They set goals and tried to develop ways to measure progress, but were stymied by resistance to federal interference in local school decisions. Seven years later, governors and 44 top corporate leaders met at IBM’s conference center in Palisades, Read more…

Christopher Black: An Unindicted War Criminal

& Edward S. Herman Among the many ironies of the NATO war against Yugoslavia was the role of the International Criminal Tribunal and its chief prosecutor, Louise Arbour, elevated by Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien to Canada’s highest court in 1999. It will be argued here that that award was entirely justified on the grounds Read more…

Jim Smith: Politics in Russia

Boris Kagarlitsky is a Moscow-based writer, academic, and democratic socialist political activist. He was a leader of the Party of Labor, which was outlawed by Boris Yeltsin in the aftermath of the 1993 “presidential coup” that resulted in the destruction of parliament. Since then he has served as an advisor to various trade unions and Read more…

Sanford Kelson: Protesting SOA

The Columbus, Georgia police estimated that on November 21, 1999 there were nearly 10,000 at the front gate of Fort Benning protesting the School of the Americas which is located on the base. SOA Watch believes the correct number is 12,000. The protest is held yearly on the anniversary of the murders of six Jesuit Read more…

avatar
David Barsamian: Monopolies, NPR, & PBS

Robert McChesney is Professor of Communications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a leading critic of corporate media. He is the author of Telecommunications, Mass Media and Democracy. His latest book is Rich Media, Poor Democracy, published by University of Illinois Press. DAVID BARSAMIAN: Will Rogers once said, “I only know what Read more…

avatar
Stephen R. Shalom: Humanitarian Intervention

Stephen R. Shalom   The issue of humanitarian intervention arises again, propelled by the crises in Kosovo and East Timor and by the memories of the 1994 Rwanda genocide. Some analysts have used these cases to support new principles of international relations. But to assure that the correct lessons are learned, we have to examine Read more…

Amanda Scioscia: Keeping My Religion

Amanda Scioscia As I stood face to face with Marta Alanis, regional coordinator of Catholics for A Free Choice in Latin America, we looked at each other with scrutiny. "I thought you’d be older," she said. "I thought you’d be more Catholic," I replied. I was baptized Catholic out of respect for cultural tradition, though Read more…

avatar
David Bacon: Will A Social Clause In Trade Agreements Advance International Solidarity?

David Bacon On November 30 the AFL-CIO mobilized thousands of union members to demonstrate in Seattle outside the meeting of trade ministers of the World Trade Organization. The labor federation called for incorporating the rights of working people around the world into the text of future trade agreements, and for treating the impact of trade Read more…

avatar
Lydia Sargent: 37.7 Seconds, Part II

Lydia Sargent As I said in Part I, the title 37.7 seconds refers to the average amount of time fathers spent each day communicating with their babies during the first three months of life, according to a 1971 study quoted in Has Feminism Changed Science? by Londa Schie- binger. This statistic seemed incredible to me, Read more…

avatar
Site Administrator: Brother, Can You Spare a Billion?

Sklar Being a billionaire used to be a really big deal. When Forbes magazine started its roll call of the 400 richest Americans in 1982, there were just 13 billionaires and 5 of them were oilman H. L. Hunt’s children. Now more than half the Forbes 400 are billionaires. The United States has 268 billionaires Read more…

Skip to toolbar