Introduce Yourself and Chat

ZSplash Forums Getting To Know One Another Introduce Yourself and Chat

This topic contains 45 replies, has 22 voices, and was last updated by avatar Rado M 6 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 46 total)
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  • #724787
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    NeSSa
    Participant

    Oh man, Santos! Animation art! I am so in awe! (I’m but a verbal artist, I fear.) Have you ever thought about posting some here? I’d love to see your work. My only encounter with animation are the little videos with goanimate 🙂 But when I’m in my element (the topics I know and love), I can create a verbal picture for you that will blow your socks off!

    Looking forward to it, Santos.

    P.S. Used to live in SF – out by Portrero Hill and then in the outer Mission; but spent almost 20 years in the Santa Cruz area – loved it.

    #724788
    avatar
    NeSSa
    Participant

    It’s a pleasure to ‘meet’ you, Nisa. I have only five friends from Afghanistan – they live in Kabul, and I came to know them through a Oneness organization. They have a small group of folks that go out every weekend and pick up trash and help out with whatever is needed to keep their community an integrative one.

    I, too, look forward to learning and sharing. May your day be filled with blessings and belly laughs!

    P.S. My hubby is from the UK – London. In what general area do you live? Do you like it?

    Cheers.

    NeSSa

    #724789
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    NeSSa
    Participant

    Hi Dan –

    What kind of music do you make? I play keyboard, flute, and Bodhran (a hand-crafted Irish drum; originally an instrument of Celtic conflicts, but now it can be heard along with the other wonderful instruments that make up the Irish music.)

    Cheers.

    NeSSa

    #724792
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    John Little
    Participant

    NeSSA,

    Glad to hear you’ll soon be an ex-Southerner. Spain is enjoyable. I have friends in Bilbao. It’s a nice area. Enjoy it there and if you need help, let me know. Maybe you can sell my phrasable verb matrix in euskalaretoa. BTW, the 1% are rioting in the streets in Venezuela and the 99% are holding tough! What’s this world coming to?? lol

    • This reply was modified 7 years, 4 months ago by avatar John Little.
    #724803
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    jonpatterns
    Participant

    Hi NeSSa

    I’ve watch Jimmy’s Hall and The Wind that Shakes the Barley over the last couple of weeks. I found the later quite disturbing, the English really did act like fascists. Have you seen them?, would be interesting to get a Irish opinion on them.

    Regarding Venezuela I would recommend watching
    From Exile to Radicalization in Venezuela – Edgardo Lander on Reality Asserts Itself (1/9)

    According to Edgardo Lander the Chavistas need to build an economy that isn’t dependent on oil and discuss the differences of opinion in the population – allowing the people’s councils to be more inclusive.

    #725490
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    John Little
    Participant

    Jon,
    Good points. My Venezuelan friends haven’t commented on Lander yet, but I watched two of the nine and I was very impressed with his knowledge and understanding of both Venezuela and the US. TRNN is one of the best video channels out there. I highly recommend it. The documentary, “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,” is equally enlightening. For daily analysis of the country, venezuelanalysis.com is my favorite.

    I just finished the book, “Inside Europe,” John Gunther, 1938 edition. Extremely interesting and very informative. All the major players of Europe in 1938 are there which means: Churchill merits only one paragraph, de Gaulle isn’t even mentioned, but Hitler gets five chapters, Stalin gets three chapters, Mussolini gets three chapters, Leon Blum gets one, King Edward gets two, Dollfuss gets two, Ataturk and Pilsudski along with Carol, Lupescu, Masaryk and Benes all get one as well. If you want to know what people were thinking before a second world war started, this will explain it all.

    #726093
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    NeSSa
    Participant

    Hopefully coming to their senses! I shall take you up on your offer, John, when I get closer, thanks. I spent many a pleasant afternoon in Donostía at a little bookstore on the square, with the owner helping me to begin the learning process of Euskara – a language all its own and quite ancient. I was there for a while, and over the 10th of April. The woman with whom I was staying cautioned me not to go down to the beach because it was solidarity day and ‘things could happen.’ So, of course I went right down. I wound up with the most beautiful, inspiring day! I sang “We Shall Overcome” in Spanish, and talked with many young folks who really have a sense of What Is (unlike so many here, unfortunately.)

    I lived in a tiny place in a hostel that my friend owns – to my right on my wee balcony, the cathedral; to the left down about a block and a half, the bay – and out that bay and across the Atlantic, Wexford Town in the southeast of Eire. I’m making myself homesick! I’d like to hear more about your verb matrix.

    Con amistad,

    NeSSa

    #726128
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    NeSSa
    Participant

    Thanks Jon!

    I shall watch it for sure and let you know. As to the British, I know probably more than you care to hear. My dad was Irish (one of the first names on the Peace Keepers’ wall in Dublin), and though I came to the awareness late (I am a South Philly born & raised North American), it was a radical and disturbing learning curve. I remember the first time I went to Ireland – a visit to friends of my brother’s prior to moving there – and I stopped in Temple Bar. In one of the wee shops, I looked for some music (I am beyond a music lover and actually created and still have an eBay vinyl music shop) I found some Irish music – one set of long-ago songs that, later, my Wisdom Elder ladyfriend sang with me and I watched dance back through the years – and the other set was called “50 Irish Rebel Songs.” The young girl behind the counter cautioned me that not everyone would like to hear those. I said, “I’m an American.” She nodded and said, “ah, never mind.” 🙂

    Venezuela – as for most of Latin America – is always looking at the challenge and control of the Criollo class (Our Grifter Class here.) I have a muy amigo who is a journalist there and we correspond frequently. Thanks for the video, and I am grateful for having met you. Hope we get to engage more.

    I’ll get back to you when I’m done. I’m currently working on a school essay on Antonio Machado and a play by Alarcón. It’s a class on Lit of Spain – my last Spanish class before I graduate.

    Cheers!

    NeSSa

    #727084
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    John Little
    Participant

    NeSSa,

    Here is a short video my brother did on my verb matrix back in 2009:

    #964516
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    s.shetler
    Participant

    Hi David, It sounds like you do a lot. How old is your kid/s?

    #964517
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    s.shetler
    Participant

    @Clint LaForge I like that you place such importance on the social element of your work. I’m sure it means a lot to your colleagues.

    • This reply was modified 7 years ago by avatar s.shetler.
    #970640

    Miracle Max
    Participant

    Max here in Dallas, Texas. Get in touch with me if you are near the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. I’m working with a couple groups and trying to build up local IOPS chapters as well. You can reach me at iopsdallas@gmail.com

    #972178

    Matt Grantham
    Participant

    I am working on a local food and health movement here in Napa Ca. I have gathered a lot of information which I feel is appropriate for such a movement. My particular way of organizing the information includes 3 or 4 categories based on food and health.

    These are-

    1- Growing Food

    2- Cooking

    3-The Food Consumer

    4-Health

    The other I have roughly termed Local Networking which takes on the human element of how we coordinate at the local level relate to these 4 categories and thus includes information and discussions on alternative currency, cooperatives, open source issues, share and gift economy DIY.

    Sorry if that is a limited explanation, but I have spent a few years of my life dedicated to this and believe I can elaborate pretty well if anyone is interested in questioning me on the ideas. Transition has postured itself as being the leaders in this area, but I have had a tough time in getting anyone including their leadership to even talk to me

    Finally I have tried communicating a few economists in regard to localism in general, as well as how to do abstract analysis of the local economic impacts of locally grown food and healthier lifestyle choices. In other to do economic prospective analysis of given community which maximizes its potential to grow food locally and to live healthier lifestyles compared to present conditions. Yes such an abstraction is subject to all kinds dependent factors, such as what foods can actually be grown in any given community and what health changes can actually be accomplished for those willing to effect lifestyle and dietary choices. My general though is to try to do some of the economic comparisons between the modern industrialized community and a prospective one based on locally based ag and health, is that the analysis be based to some degree in the work hours concept. In other words you could start by working on estimates of how much time an average person would need to work in a local food production economy to generate the food for their necessary dietary needs. Also similar estimates seemingly are possible in the comparisons in health costs between the modern American community and a prospective health enhanced community

    Perhaps this all sounds silly but I have found Mr Albert’s ideas to resonate quite strongly in this line of thinking for me at least. The discussions with Gar Alpervitz certainly highlight this difficulty in trying envision practical change in the given system with more objective abstraction towards systems that ‘could be’

    Thanks for all that are here, and for this opportunity to communicate

    Matt Grantham
    Napa Ca

    #972182

    Michael
    Keymaster

    Here is a suggestion – figure out what you really find compelling about the idea of local self reliance, etc. etc.

    Then ask, wait, do those virtues require and are they even advanced in all cases by a region or place getting none of its inputs from a distant source, and giving non to a distant destination. I am betting you will find that the answer is no – and that your commitment to local networking is actually a commitment to certain kinds of social connection, certain kinds of valuation and distribution, and so on….

    #972195

    Matt Grantham
    Participant

    Utilizing the innate advantages of cooperative local economic and political activity should not be so easily interpreted as isolationist. at least that is what I am getting from your comments. The informational connectivity of any given community dedicated towards cooperative local economic activity has little bearing on the exchange of information and ideas. Actually I would suggest a cooperatively engaged community is more likely to have direct access to certain forms of creativity and more likely to contribute to regional discussion as opposed to than does the anonymous, entrenched, and formulaic behavior that is attributed to centralized systems. I would suggest there is a conundrum here. I understand the concept that the degrees of freedom, of whatever you wish to call the idea that an individual allowed to freely act within a larger system seemingly has set of opportunities that are more diverse than someone who is restricted to interaction with a smaller group of people. But for me at least, this can be somewhat illusory. For instance the facelessness of economic activity at a distance does have both sociological and economic implication that seems rather obviously detrimental.

    Perhaps this is argumentative, and honestly prefer discussion that aim to be civil. so I apologize if it is seen in such a light I am not sure I understand the significance of your last sentence. I agree with how you have summarized my views , yes local networking is a commitment to certain kinds of social interaction etc, but it seems you are suggesting that is somewhat/completely different than general economic activity? At times I have a pretty broad way of interpreting the word economic and tend to see it as a rather subjective experience of individuals and the actions that give them pleasure, security, etc

    So it seems, maybe I am wrong, that you have a generally negative reaction to so called localism in general? I ask the question in order to be clear whether it is my explanation and interpretation that seem to be lacking, or the more general issue. I would suggest that people can of course organize themselves in many fashions locally, and that the issue should not be seen as a one size fits all issue

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