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Recent ZNet

Studs Terkel: Hope Dies Last

Hope has never trickled down. It has always sprung up. That’s what Jessie de la Cruz meant when she said, “I feel there’s gonna be a change, but we’re the ones gonna do it, not the government. With us, there’s a saying, ‘La esperanza muere última. Hope dies last.’ You can’t lose hope. If you Read more…

Kazuya Amano: An Eighteen-Year-Old Works to Abolish Child Labor

[It has been estimated that throughout the world 250 million minors under eighteen, “Child Laborers”, are engaged in dangerous and cruel professions.  This is the story of a Japanese high school student and her activities with an NGO devoted to ending this situation. It is widely believed that the problem of child labor is primarily Read more…

Simon Helweg-larsen: The Fall of Rios Montt

Months of political violence reached a surprising anti-climax on November 9, as the Guatemalan elections were realized amid relative calm. Even the main result of the election was positive, as General Efrain Rios Montt lost his bid for the presidency and accepted his distant third place. Of course, after the bloodiest campaign period since before Read more…

Mukoma Ngugi: Conversing With Africa

Can you tell ZNet, please, what your new book is about? What is it trying to communicate? In Conversing with Africa: Politics of Change, I am trying to communicate the need of activists in Africa and elsewhere to restore a much needed radical dialogue.  In a forthcoming book from Kimaathi Publishing House (Looking at America: Read more…

Maria Tomchick: Mass Transit: What Our Tax Dollars Should Be Paying For

Here in the U.S., we live under the myth that mass transit should have to pay for itself, that it should exist without infusions of taxpayer money. The whole notion is absurd. Freeways and road improvements use up public funds, and the auto industry thrives on tax breaks and government incentives–the worst of which are Read more…

Stan Goff: Bring the Troops Home Now

Stan Goff knows better than most people about what really goes on in the US military. He served from 1970 through 1996, for many years as a Master Sergeant with the Special Forces and Delta Force and as a military instructor at West Point. In the process of his military career he was deployed to Read more…

Imran andrew Price: Australia’s Responsibility in Iraq

Although final details have not yet been announced from the recent International Donor Conference in Madrid for the reconstruction of Iraq, Australia is contributing much less than many other countries, and very little considering their role in the invasion. A list of the published amounts promised by various governments is as follows: $20bn from the Read more…

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Robert Fisk: The Palestine Regiment

No one remembers the Palestine Regiment. Even this morning, on the actual day of remembrance, few will recall that Arab and Jew once fought together under the British flag against Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. Even fewer will know the extraordinary story of an Arab and a Jew who fought side by side against Hitler, Read more…

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Paul Burrows: Lest We Forget: Nov. 11th Commemorations

This Remembrance Day, let us remember Canadians who fought and died during the two World Wars and the Korean War. Let us also remember those of other nations (Germans, Russians, Japanese, Koreans and many others) who fought and died as our allies, or our enemies. Let us also remember that those who fought and died Read more…

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John Pilger: The Silence Of Writers

For the great writers of the 20th century, art could not be separated from politics. Today, there is a disturbing silence on the dark matters that should command our attention. In 1935, the first Congress of American Writers was held at the Carnegie Hall in New York, followed by another two years later. By one Read more…

Mitchell Plitnick: An Accord No One is Hearing

In September 2000, amidst tensions heightened by the collapse of peace negotiations at Camp David the preceding summer, the second intifada began. The reasons for the failure at Camp David have been debated and examined at considerable length. The myth that the impasse was entirely the fault of Yasir Arafat — a notion promoted by Read more…

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Neve Gordon: The Apartheid Wall

JERUSALEM: As the government of the Jewish state forces the Palestinians in ghettos, history must be turning in its grave. Qalqiliya, a city of 45,000, has been surrounded by a concrete wall and only those who are granted permits by the Civil Administration can enter and exit the city’s single gate. Along the West Bank’s Read more…

Jeff Mclellend: How Militant Civil Disobedience Brought Down The Bolivian Government

“La protesta es una mujer de fierro sin partido ni caudillo” Teeming with tens of thousands of angry protesters and shaking from the resounding blasts of dynamite, the streets of La Paz on October 18th were the scene of a dramatic climax to the past 6 weeks of mounting protests. Multiple marches had descended from Read more…

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Norman Solomon: War, Social Justice, Media and Democracy

Prepared text of speech at the Brazilian Social Forum November 8, 2003 Belo Horizonte, Brazil I am very glad to be here to participate in the Brazilian Social Forum. For me and the grassroots activists who I work with every day in the United States, many events have caused us to feel discouraged during the Read more…

Hanadi Loubani: Occupation, Patriarchy, and the Palestinian Women’s Movement

Hanadi Loubani is currently a Ph.D. candidate at York University, and is a founding member of Women for Palestine, a feminist, anti-racist Palestinian solidarity group.  She is also a founder and member of a Palestinian/Jewish women’s dialogue group in Toronto.  During August of 2002, Loubani participated in a mission to Palestine and Israel entitled “The Read more…

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Tom Engelhardt: Whose Analogy Is This Anyway?

Withdrawal maneuvers:   Throw into this mix the first rumors of the return of the draft (see, e.g., Toronto Star, 11/5/03), add in the controversy over the President’s avoidance of those coffins and funerals (an issue whose origins lie in the Vietnam era) and you have the makings of quite a potent brew — Vietnam’s Read more…

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Tom Engelhardt: Whose Analogy Is This Anyway?

Here are parts of a rather ordinary summary report on 24 hours in Iraq from Slobodan Lekic of the Associated Press. They nonetheless manage to highlight several aspects of the present crisis. His piece (11/8/03) begins:   “A senior U.S. official insisted on Saturday that the U.S. military has the upper hand in the escalating Read more…

Odessa Steps: The Sad Conceit of Participatory Economics

As social and organizational anarchists, members of the Anarchist Federation in Britain believe that a free, fair and stable society of the future must be of a particular kind – anarchist communism. But as class struggle anarchists we rarely spend a lot of time thinking about, describing and experimenting with the forms of the future Read more…

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Michael Albert: The Joyous Potential Of Economic Vision

I recently had an opportunity to read an essay criticizing Participatory Economics from Odessa Steps, titled The Sad Conceit of Participatory Economics. My reactions to what appeared in it, trying to correct strange readings, mostly, lead me to want to urge merely that readers actually take a look at the model for themselves. But a Read more…

Keiichi Tsuneishi: Disposing of Japan’s World War II Poison Gas in China

In addition to disposing of the weapons that have already been found, Japan is required to promptly find and destroy those whose whereabouts remain unknown.   In late September, the Tokyo District Court ruled in favor of Chinese plaintiffs demanding compensation for damages caused by chemical weapons left behind in China by the Imperial Japanese Read more…

Lee Sustar: Taking A Stand For Health Care

THE BIG grocery strikes in Southern California and the Midwest have put a spotlight on the rapidly worsening health care crisis in the U.S.–and the efforts of employers to push rising costs onto workers. “The tens of thousands of workers who are on strike in California, West Virginia and elsewhere for quality, affordable health care Read more…

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Nick Turse: The Tip of the Iceberg:

On October 19, 2003, the Ohio-based newspaper the Toledo Blade launched a four-day series of investigative reports exposing a string of atrocities by an elite, volunteer, 45-man “Tiger Force” unit of the U.S. Army’s 101st Airborne Division over the course of seven months in 1967. The Blade goes on to state that in 1971 the Read more…

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Russell Mokhiber: Say No to Silicone

Eleven years ago, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced it was pulling silicone breast implants from the market, leaving them available only to breast cancer survivors who needed them for reconstruction or to women enrolled in limited clinical studies. The reason for the action, announced then-FDA Commissioner David Kessler, was that, under the law, Read more…

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Paul Street: Starve the Racist Prison Beast

Let me start by quoting quote my favorite historical personality from Indiana – the great democratic Socialist Eugene Debs, from Terre Haute. “While there is a lower class,” Debs once said, “I am of it. While there is a criminal element,” he added, “I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I Read more…

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Ricardo Levins Morales: The Return of History: Mirage of Conquest, Oasis of Resistence

The Empire backfires The eighty seven billion dollars in public funds approved by the US Congress this fall will be used mostly in a vain attempt to escape a stubborn reality: that the United States has lost its war in Iraq. That the occupation is doomed to fail will not be accepted in respectable (“failure Read more…

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Michael Albert: Parecon Query and Reply

Below are ten frequently asked questions that I try to succinctly answer. 1. Why do we need vision at all? Why should we worry about the shape of a future society? Isn’t it sufficient to reject current injustice? People throughout society know that activists want to escape contemporary oppressions. They know we seek short run aims Read more…

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Naomi Klein: Iraq Is Not America’s To Sell

Bring Halliburton home. Cancel the contracts. Ditch the deals. Rip up the rules. Those are just a few of the suggestions for slogans that could help unify the growing movement against the occupation of Iraq. So far, activist debates have focused on whether the demand should be for a complete withdrawal of troops, or for Read more…

Aaron Mate: Pillage Is Forbidden

What are the US-UK’s responsibilities as occupier of Iraq? On May 22 2003, the United Nations Security Council passed Resolution 1483, abolishing sanctions against Iraq and recognising the United States and United Kingdom as the country’s occupying powers. The resolution called upon the US-UK authority to “comply fully with their obligations under international law, including Read more…

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Michael Albert: Parecon Query and Reply

Below are ten frequently asked questions that I try to succinctly answer. 1. Why do we need vision at all? Why should we worry about the shape of a future society? Isn’t it sufficient to reject current injustice? People throughout society know that activists want to escape contemporary oppressions. They know we seek short run aims Read more…

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Hossam el-Hamalawy: Forgotten Victims of Egypt’s ‘War on Terror’

Once, sometimes twice, a month, Aisha Abdel Salam Saleh is ready for her journey by early sunrise. “For three days before it, I already can’t sleep! I am tense all the time,” she says. Waiting to see her youngest son, Abdallah, who has been detained without charges for seven years, the sixty-year-old woman spends days Read more…

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Robert Fisk: When Did ‘Arab’ Become a Dirty Word?

Is “Palestinian” now just a dirty word? Or is “Arab” the dirty word? Let’s start with the late Edward Said, the brilliant and passionate Palestinian-American academic who wrote–among many other books–Orientalism, the ground-breaking work which first explored our imperial Western fantasies about the Middle East. After he died of leukaemia last month, Zev Chafets sneered Read more…

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Mark Weisbrot: Anti-Sweatshop Movement

Last week Sean “P. Diddy” Combs became the latest celebrity to feel the heat of the anti- sweatshop movement, as charges that his “Sean John” T-shirts were being manufactured under inhumane conditions burst onto to the TV news. Mr. Combs, whose latest hit “Shake Ya Tail Feather” with fellow hip-hop stars Murphy Lee and Nelly Read more…

Pierre Pariseau: Goodies in Tokyo

George Bush came to town two weeks ago. More than 9000 Tokyo police officers were out to greet him and assure his visit would be without any glitches. Choppers flying in formation at low altitude over the river west of the city, dozens of riot police buses left idling all day and all night near Read more…

Steven Hill: California Recall Lessons

The California recall dominated national and state politics in the early fall, culminating in voters rejecting Gov. Gray Davis in favor of movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger. The election truly was historic — Davis is only the second governor in the nation’s history to be recalled — and the fact that voters handled such a large Read more…

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Norman Solomon: The Iraq Trap

Media outlets are filled with bad news about Iraq. A theme is emerging: This administration doesn’t know how to run an occupation!   Those who oppose President Bush may welcome the recent shift in the media climate. But when war-makers get frustrated, they’re inclined to heighten the violence. And some critics of the occupation’s management Read more…

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Robert Fisk: When Did “Arab” Become a Dirty Word?

Is “Palestinian” now just a dirty word? Or is “Arab” the dirty word? Let’s start with the late Edward Said, the brilliant and passionate Palestinian-American academic who wrote–among many other books–Orientalism, the ground-breaking work which first explored our imperial Western fantasies about the Middle East. After he died of leukaemia last month, Zev Chafets sneered Read more…

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Robert Fisk: When Did “Arab” Become a Dirty Word?

Is “Palestinian” now just a dirty word? Or is “Arab” the dirty word? Let’s start with the late Edward Said, the brilliant and passionate Palestinian-American academic who wrote–among many other books–Orientalism, the ground-breaking work which first explored our imperial Western fantasies about the Middle East. After he died of leukaemia last month, Zev Chafets sneered Read more…

Mickey Z: Stepping on a Flea

October 25, the twentieth anniversary of a momentous American victory, came and went without a surprising lack of fanfare. I’m talking, of course, about a military operation that warmed Ronald Reagan’s cold, cold heartÅ and was deemed film-worthy by the former mayor of Carmel. Yes, it¹s the liberation of Grenada. In March 1979, socialist leader Maurice Read more…

Tim Harper: pentagon Keeps Dead Out Of Sight

Charles H. Buehring came home last week. He arrived at the air force base in Dover, Del., in the middle of the night, in an aluminum shipping case draped in an American flag. When the military truck drove his remains across the tarmac, workers paused and removed their hats. He was met by a six-member Read more…

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Nick Turse: The Military-Industrial-Entertainment Complex Takes Training Over “There”

Over there, over there,Send the word, send the word, over there —That the (virtual-militarized-avatar-) Yanks are coming,The (virtual-militarized-avatar-) Yanks are coming,The (digital) drums rum-tumming(virtually) Ev’rywhere.So prepare, say a pray’r,Send the word, send the word to beware.We’ll be over, we’re coming over,And we won’t come back till it’s overOver there.   — “Over There” (1917), a Read more…

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George Monbiot: Acceptable Hatred

Imagine an English village building an effigy of a car, with caricatures of black people in the windows and the numberplate “N1GGER”, and burning it in a public ceremony. Then imagine one of Britain’s most socially-conscious MPs appearing to suggest that black people were partly to blame for the way they had been portrayed. It Read more…

Jeff Sommers: Commissars, Consultants, And Catastrophe

This past month marks the tenth anniversary of Boris Yelstin shelling Russia’s parliament.  That dreadful event witnessed at least a hundred protesters killed, and brought to an end the period of open possibilities for Russia’s future.  This tragedy brought to a close the rich interest in politics that marked Gorbachev’s rule.  For a brief moment Read more…

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Tariq Ali: Resistance Is The First Step Towards Iraqi Independence

Some weeks ago, Pentagon inmates were invited to a special in-house showing of an old movie. It was the Battle of Algiers, Gillo Pontecorvo’s anti-colonial classic, initially banned in France. One assumes the purpose of the screening was purely educative. The French won that battle, but lost the war. At least the Pentagon understands that Read more…

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Uri Avnery: Cancer Cells

In the Six-Day War, hundreds of Israeli soldiers were murdered while storming the Sinai desert, the West Bank and the Golan heights. In the Yom-Kippur War, more than 2000 Israeli soldiers were murdered in the defense of the conquered territories. In the 18 year long Lebanon War, more than a thousand Israeli soldiers were murdered Read more…

Satya Sagar: Fuzzy Words and Sharp Bullets

There is an image that has been haunting me in my sleep for the past many months now. It is an image from the first wave of bombing raids carried out by US warplanes in the town of Basra in southern Iraq. In this image there is a tired, broken Iraqi father who is lifting Read more…

Asahi shimbun: Article 9, Iraq and Revision of the Japanese Constitution

[This editorial appeared in the Asahi Shimbun, Nov. 3, 2003 and International Herald Tribune/Asahi, Nov. 4, 2003.]   There are many points for discussion on constitutional revision, but it is Article 9 that bears most upon the future course of our nation. The LDP makes no specific mention of it, but that article is exactly Read more…

Hideaki Hiratate: Teacher Suicides and the Future of Japanese Education

Part 2: What is Happening to Education in Hiroshima?   Keitoku Kazuhiro, 56, the principal of Takasugi Elementary School in the city of Onomichi, Hiroshima Prefecture, took his own life on March 9 of this year. It was a suicide caused by overwork.   In March 2002 Keitoku had been brought in from the private Read more…

Hideaki Hiratate: Teacher Suicides and the Future of Japanese Education

[The quality and elan of primary and secondary education have long been regarded as among the achievements of postwar Japan. Journalist Hiratate Hideaki uses the window of increasing teacher suicides to probe recent changes in education that have placed many of Japan’s finest teachers on a collision course with their principles, supervisors, and ultimately the Read more…

Brian Forrest: The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

In 2001, Kim Bartley and Donnacha O’Briain traveled to Venezuela to videotape a behind-the-scenes profile of President Hugo Chavez, the democratically elected leftist president who had been swept into office by a groundswell of support from the poor sections of Venezuela’s cities and countryside.  While filming in April of 2002, they found themselves in the Read more…

Toni Solo: Robert Zoellick and ‘Wise Blood’

It takes one bizarre fiction to understand another. Flannery O’Connor’s 1952 novel “Wise Blood” is full of insight into its not so distant relation “Free Trade”. Hazel Motes, O’Connor’s would-be nihilist protagonist, preaches a “Church without Christ” with all the zealous fervour of Zoellick’s devotion to “Free Trade” without free trade. Lurking in the the Read more…

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