ZMag Archives

Cecilia Zarate-laun: The War On Drugs From The Supply Side

  Last October 25 a paramilitary patrol landed on the small town of El Aro in Colombia’s northern Antioquia province, with the intention of "doing away with the guerrillas." For five days the town was converted into a con¬≠centration camp. First, they killed Andres Mendoza,Wilmar Restrepo, RosaMaria Barrera, and Dora Angela Areiza in front of Read more…

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John M. Laforge: Nuclear Disarmament

The clamor for nuclear disarmament is being raised by millions the world over not only by established peace and anti-nuclear organizations, but by NGOs, scientific panels, retired generals, eminent military and civilian officials, nuclear weapons designers, and international judges. With the influential weight of these new voices, the United States has an opportunity to reconsider Read more…

Sandy Carter: Feminism and Classic Blues

   Because blues is such a heavily male dominated musical genre, it’s often forgotten that the first popular blues recording stars were women. During the 1920s when the emerging recording industry first realized the commercial potential of blues, women so dominated recorded blues that the popular image of a blues singer was a big-voiced black Read more…

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Edward Herman: The U.S. Jobs Miracle

  In both Europe and the United States, the substantial growth in U.S. jobs over the past several decades has been repeatedly cited in support of the view that a “flexible” labor market is the solution to the problem of unemployment that has beset the West once again. “Flexible” is a euphemism for “unorganized and Read more…

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Michael Bronski: Onward, Christian Soldiers?

  Gay Pride, Boston, June 21, 1977: It was a hot Saturday afternoon on Boston Common, and the crowd listening to speeches was restless. At long last, Charley Shively (professor of history at Boston College and a founder of Fag Rag, one of the first gay-liberation publications in the country) began his keynote speech. Sounding Read more…

Sharon Beder: Global Spin: The Corporate Assault on Environmentalism

Chelsea Green, 288 pp. Review by David Edwards This book deals with the real environmental crisis—the crisis that lies in the fact that the modern mass media system is a corporate system deeply embedded in, and dependent on, the wider corporate status quo; and in the related capacity of corporate power to boost facts, ideas, Read more…

Kate Duncan: Microbroadcasting

  The movement for low-power community radio was relatively low-key until Stephen Dunifer founded Free Radio Berkeley with the intent not just to operate a small radio station, but to go to court in its defense. While the case lingered in the 9th Federal District Court, Dunifer used the protection of microbroadcasting’s legal limbo to Read more…

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Jeremy Brecher: Labor Update: Organizing the New Workforce

Jeremy Brecher   Traditionally, the majority of American union members have been blue-collar white males. Over the past quarter-century, this group became a smaller and smaller minority in the workforce, while other groups—sometimes dubbed “the new workforce”—grew as a percentage of organized and unorganized workers. The proportion of workers who were women started to grow Read more…

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Henry A. Giroux: none

  The assault by corporate America on public education has taken an ominous turn in the last decade. Funded by an array of conservative institutions such as the Heritage Foundation, Hudson Institute, and the Olin Foundation, the corporate drive to undermine public education has enlisted an army of conservative pundits many of whom served in Read more…

Catherine Cevoli: The Freeze: A Look Back

  It was the summer of 1992, and I was watching the second presidential debate. George Bush was explaining how Reagan’s military build-up ended the Cold War. “The Russians couldn’t keep up and it destroyed them,” he said. “If we’d listened to all those nuclear freezers, we’d still have the Cold War today.” I put Read more…

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