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Dorothy Guellec: The Abandonment of the patient In profit-driven health care

Guellec Profit-driven healthcare is what we have today, but the end may be in sight, at least the former JAMA Editor George D. Lundberg (Journal of the American Medical Association) thinks so. In his explosive new book “Severed Trust: Why American Medicine Hasn’t Been Fixed” he goes on the record and claims “managed care is Read more…

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Aziz Choudry: Battling to derail the TNCs in New Zealand

Choudry The UNCTAD World Investment Report 2000 rated New Zealand as the most transnationalised economy in the OECD. Most of New Zealand’s productive, financial, energy, retail, transport, media and communications sectors are now in the hands of transnational corporations (TNCs) that have sucked huge profits out of the country. TNCs have benefitted enormously from the Read more…

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Site Administrator: Learning About Quebec and Canada

government leaders to negotiate a Free Trade Areas of the Americas (FTAA). There’s been much talk about the security and anti-protest measures being taken by the Canadian government. But Quebec is much more than simply a location for a protest against the corporate neo-liberal agenda. It would be a pity if activists didn’t use the Read more…

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Tim Wise: 15 Dead in Ohio: The Black and the Blue in Cincinnati

Wise Sometimes, folks don’t even bother hiding their racism. Take Keith Fangman, President of the Cincinnati Fraternal Order of Police. In the wake of this past week’s uprising to protest the killing of Tim Thomas and fourteen other black men by his colleagues since 1995, Fangman said: "If we give one inch to these terrorists Read more…

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David Edwards: To The Mad House With Them

  In his study of obedience in modern society, psychologist Stanley Milgram wrote, "There is always some element of bad form in objecting to the destructive course of events, or indeed, in making it a topic of conversation." Milgram noted that even Nazi’s most closely associated with the ‘final solution’ considered it an act of Read more…

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Saul Landau: Bay of Pigs Lessons

Landau What have we learned from what historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr dubbed "the perfect failure?" Schlesinger, who served as a high level adviser to president John F. Kennedy, opposed the CIA backed invasion of Cuba’s Bay of Pigs by a brigade of anti Castro Cuban exiles. But at last week’s Bay of Pigs conference in Read more…

Sean Healy: Is Globalization Inevitable

Healy “The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn’t exist.” — Roger “Verbal” Kint (Kevin Spacey), The Usual Suspects, 1995. “M1 can be as big as it likes”, someone recently said to me, “but isn’t opposing globalisation a bit like opposing the telephone?” Not quite. Rulers always justify their actions Read more…

Noy Thrupkaew: Going Geisha

Thrupkaew After returning from Japan a few years ago, I was surprised to see that the States was in a lather over "geisha chic"-which persists to this day. Chopsticks were stuck in heads fair and dark. Madonna, that fashion chameleon, appeared in a red vinyl kimono, with her hair in a sharp, asymmetrical bob that Read more…

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Patrick Bond: The World Bank in the time of cholera

Bond / Johannesburg One of the most painful preventable diseases known to humankind, cholera, continues to spread in South Africa, affecting hundreds of people a day. More than 80,000 people have been infected over the last eight months, and approximately 180 have lost their lives, mostly in KwaZulu-Natal province, just north of Durban–where the UN’s Read more…

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Pervez Hoodbhoy: OUR BLIND NUCLEAR PROPHETS

Hoodbhoy Having thrown away several hundred, I still have in my possession about a hundred newspaper articles on the nuclear issue written in Pakistan and India over the past decade. The authors, overwhelmingly, are establishment nuclear "experts" and "strategists". These people, actively assisted on both sides by the state and its media, have effectively monopolized Read more…

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Tariq Ali: CRISIS ON ANIMAL FARM

Ali ‘Don’t worry,’ New Farmer Blair told a visiting delegation of over a hundred sheep when news of the plague first reached him. ‘Everything is safe and under control. We will be tough on the plague and tough on the causes of the plague.’ The sheep were greatly reassured. After all they had placed their Read more…

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Sonia Shah: The Curious Politics of Milk: Part Three

Shah Anti-formula activists and development officials often claim that millions of infants die every year because they are not breastfed (this is probably based on the fact that millions of infants die of diarrhea from contaminated water every year–which they could ingest in a number of ways.) Even if a woman is privileged enough to Read more…

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Edward Herman: UNCLE CHUTZPAH GETS BACK INTO THE RING

S. Herman Now that the humanitarian warrior Bill Clinton has been replaced by a compassionate conservative extremely close to the oil industry, military-industrial-complex, and Christian Right/"pro- life" (fetal, that is, not post-fetal) forces, what may we expect in foreign policy? Funny thing is that Clinton, though a tremendous blow-hard, did a lot of killing with Read more…

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Cynthia Peters: Solidarity with East Timor: New Challenges, New Opportunities

Peters U.S. activists’ contribution to the effort to end Indonesia’s brutal 25-year occupation of East Timor paid off. In August 1999 a vast majority of East Timorese – after years of immense suffering and patient organizing — courageously voted for independence. In September 1999, the Indonesian military pulled out of East Timor, finally ending its Read more…

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George Monbiot: Mad Cows Are Back

Monbiot Published in BBC Wildlife magazine April 2001 It should have been dead and buried years ago. But somehow the spectre of BSE keeps rising from the grave. In Britain, where billions of pounds have been spent and millions of cattle slaughtered to stamp out the disease, new cases continue to emerge. The German government, Read more…

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Norman Solomon: U.S.-CHINA DISPUTE: FROM OTHER SIDE OF MEDIA WINDOW

Solomon It’s not easy to look at ourselves as others might see us. For a  country, the need is especially acute in times of international crisis —  but that’s when nationalism and other reflexive biases are most likely to  become pivotal. One of the ways to test for media slant is to put the shoe Read more…

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Patrick Bond: Globalization from Below

Prokosch   The Local Faces of Anti-(Corporate) Globalization In the year since Seattle, the movement for global economic justice has shown that it’s here to stay. It has staged three national demonstrations against the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the one-party system controlled by corporate capital. It has kept itself in the media, Read more…

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Manning Marable: Public Education and Black Empowerment

Marable   Part One I recently was keynote speaker at the National Caucus of Black School Board Members, held during the sixty-first annual National School Boards Association in San Diego. I met hundreds of dedicated, progressive African-American community leaders who serve tirelessly on public school boards throughout the country. The Black Caucus functions as a Read more…

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Ben Bagdikian: A SECRET IN THE NEWS: THE COUNTRY’S PERMANENT POOR

Bagdikian It can be the best of times or the worst of times, but whether in prosperity or recession, there is one constant in the United States economy–the richest country in the world has maintained a permanent class of Americans who are poor. That is not an accident. It is maintained by official action as Read more…

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Nikos Raptis: Norman Rockwell

Raptis Norman Rockwell was born in 1894 and died in 1978. For almost sixty years he worked as an illustrator. He did covers for the Saturday Evening Post, for 47 years. Those covers played a significant role in the cultural environment in which two generations of Americans grew up. In the present text an effort Read more…

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Laura Flanders: Taxes for Terrorists?

The promoters of Faith-based action appear to be divided: Don Eberly, deputy director of the of White House Office of Faith-based and Community Initiatives told the Washington Post March 11 that the Administration is delaying its plan to funnel taxpayer dollars to religious charities. The White House, however, and Eberly’s boss, Don DiIulio say that Read more…

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Bill Berkowitz: Moon Shadows

Bill Berkowitz Some 1,700 religious, civic, and political leaders attended a January 19 pre-inaugural prayer luncheon. The guest list included a host of Religious Right luminaries; the ubiquitous Rev. Jerry Falwell, former National Evangelical Association President Don Argue, Trinity Broadcasting Network’s Paul Crouch, and a host of leaders from the Southern Baptist Convention, including President Read more…

Sera Bilezikyan: Wild Buffalo Slaughter

Sera Bilezikyan Over 65 million buffalo once roamed this country. A massive extermination of the species was launched in order to destroy the native peoples of the Great Plains, recognizing their dependence on the buffalo for every purpose from food and materials to spirituality. By 1900, when the native peoples were themselves massively reduced in Read more…

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Michael Bronski: Before Night Falls

Bronski There is no surprise that Javier Bardem’s exquisite performance as the late gay Cuban novelist Reinaldo Arenas in Julian Schnabel’s Before Night Falls is worthy of praise. It is nuanced, thoughtful, and entirely convincing. What is surprising is that it got nominated for an Oscar this year by the usually more conservative Academy of Read more…

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Roger Bybee: none

Will Hutton and Anthony Giddens The New Press, New York, 2000, 241 pages. By Roger Bybee On October 4, 1996, long-time workers at Johnson Controls’ valve plant in Milwaukee were rewarded with a lavish dinner and plaques and pins for their years of service to the company. For workers who had reluctantly accepted severe economic Read more…

Vanessa Daniel: Conference on Welfare Ignites Protests in DC

Vanessa Daniel Mary Anderson had come all the way from Milwaukee, Wisconsin to a fancy hotel in Washington DC. A single mother now working for less than minimum wage in exchange for welfare benefits in Wisconsin’s notoriously harsh W-2 workfare program, neither Anderson nor any other welfare recipient had been invited to participate in the Read more…

Larry Everest: California’s Energy Crisis

Larry Everest California is in the midst of a major energy crisis, and many other states are feeling—or will soon feel—the pain. The crisis, which has been building for a year, escalated sharply in mid-January. From then until mid-February, much of California was in a near-continuous “stage 3” power alert—meaning supplies of electricity were barely Read more…

Thomas Frank: none

Frank Doubleday, 414 pages Review by Tom Gallagher It is the entrepreneurs who know the rules of the world and the laws of God.” Could you imagine reading dozens of books filled with stuff just as loopy as this pronouncement from George Gilder, the country’s leading economic cheerleader? Well, Thomas Frank has done that, and Read more…

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Edward Herman: Israel’s Approved Ethnic Cleansing, Part 1

Edward S. Herman Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians has always presented a moral problem to the West, as that treatment has violated every law and moral standard on the books. Some 750,000 Palestinians were driven from their homes in 1948-1949, and since then scores of thousands more have been pushed out by force, their houses Read more…

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Stan Karp: Bush Plan Fails Schools

Karp Five years ago the Republican presidential candidate campaigned to abolish the Department of Education and drastically cut back the federal role in education. This year a new Republican president is pledging to dramatically expand the federal role in education and make it his number one domestic priority. Unfortunately, change and progress are very different Read more…

Virginia Meredith: The Census 2000 Money Hole

Virginia Meredith As an artist, various and sometimes strange jobs come my way. When talk of the Census went around, with its intoxicating mythical promise of $18 an hour, I was intrigued enough to find the phone number and make the call. Thus began my journey into the lucrative labyrinth of not working for the Read more…

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Sonia Shah: The Celebrated Immigrant

Sonia Shah Labor and civil rights groups were outraged at Bush’s nomination of anti-affirmative action, anti-minimum wage Linda Chavez for labor secretary. But strangely, when Bush quickly replaced Chavez with anti-affirmative action, anti-minimum wage (and anti-feminist) Elaine Chao, nary a peep was heard. Chao sailed through her confirmation. For one thing, Elaine Chao is the Read more…

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Norman Solomon: Reporting On AIDS in Africa

Norman Solomon In Africa, 17 million people have already died of AIDS. In developing countries around the world, twice that many are now HIV positive. Such statistics are largely unfathomable, and news accounts rarely explore basic options for halting the deadly momentum. But during the past several weeks, some major U.S. media outlets have taken Read more…

Mark Oshinskie: The Rest Of The Story Behind Genetic Engineering

Oshinskie The Edmonds Institute is an organization that studies the social and environmental effects of technology, particularly genetic technologies. At its recent annual board meeting in Seattle, I had the chance to talk with one of the Institute’s board members, Brian Tokar, who has just finished his third book, Redesigning Life?, which was published in Read more…

Phil Wilayto: The Bradley Foundation

Wilayto When Republican presidential hopeful George W. Bush made a campaign stop in Milwaukee, Wisconsin last July, he visited a new inner city center for addicted fathers called Faith Works. It’s one of many private agencies that use religion as a motivator to help people overcome alcohol or drug problems. Bush used the visit as Read more…

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Vijay Prashad: The Problem of the Twenty-First Century is the Problem of the ColorBlind

[Adapted from Dean Shirley Newman’s Lecture Series (Facing Up to History: Racism’s Pasts and Presence) at the University of Michigan, 22 March 2001] A few years ago I had the fortune of spending a morning debating Dinesh D’Souza on the question of affirmative action. It was in Chicago at the South Asian Students’ Association annual Read more…

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Russell Mokhiber: House Call

Mokhiber and Robert Weissman Recently, we have become friends with Matt Hahn, a young medical doctor who lives in the eastern panhandle of West Virginia. Dr. Hahn is a conventional doctor in many ways — his clinic is littered with little notepads supplied by drug companies, and he treats patients with conventional medicines. But Dr. Read more…

Earl ofari Hutchinson: Ten Reasons Why Considering Reparations is a Good Idea for Americans, and Horowitz Too

Conservative muckraker David Horowitz has been verbally mugged for peddling an ad to college newspapers giving ten reasons why reparations is racist. But the name callers have done little more than canonize Horowitz as a martyr for truth and free speech. Even worse, they’ve failed miserably to tell why reparations merits a serious look. There Read more…

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Judy Rebick: Police repression biggest threat at Quebec City

Rebeck Not since the War Measures Act, thirty years ago, has there been a greater display of the armed might of the state in Canada than there will be in Quebec City during the Summit of the Americas on April 20-22. And not since the War Measures Act, when the army occupied the city of Read more…

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Marta Russell: What’s Wrong with “Charitable Choice”?

Russell President Bush is assembling his “armies of compassion” under the banner of Charitable choice — a decisive move to contract out federal social service functions such as counseling for alcohol and drug substance abuse, shelter and food services for homeless persons, assistance with employment and after school care to private religious organizations – to Read more…

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Norman Solomon: Bad News Bears Change Tone of Media Script

Solomon When the Ameritrade company launched a $200 million marketing  drive to explain the joys of online trading in autumn 1999, a barrage of TV  commercials invited viewers to join in the fun. The news was bullish, and  the firm’s motto — "Believe in yourself" — provided an upbeat message.  Tech stocks led advances in Read more…

Dorothy Guellec: Cuba offers free medical education to US minority students

Guellec It’s all about altruism man, not politics. It would be unthinkable in the US to offer much of anything for nothing, let alone a 6-year medical education, but the Cubans have been doing this for many countries in the past, and now Americans may apply. Hundreds of low-income minority students will now be fortunate Read more…

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David Cromwell: The resurgence of nuclear power?

Cromwell We haven’t heard an awful lot about nuclear power lately. Does that mean it’s a technology whose time has come and gone? Not likely. There remains the possibility that nuclear power could make a comeback through the backdoor, courtesy of the so-called ‘joint implementation’ mechanism of the Kyoto climate protocol. Joint implementation is intended Read more…

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Edward Herman: THE MEDIA-RIGHTWING POLITICAL CORRECTNESS GAMBIT RENEWED: HOROWITZ AND REPARATIONS

institutes servicing their manpower and technology needs. With the Horowitz case we are back to this super-selectivity: it is an ad that challenges a position supportive of black people by some of their spokespersons, and it is a refusal to publish this ad that the media latch on to. The ad is offered by a Read more…

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Michael Albert: Not Free Speech

Albert In todays other commentary, Ed Herman has laid waste the pretensions of pundits bleating over the plight of poor abused David Horowitz that they are sincerely concerned about free speech. But there is more to the situation…so let’s address another aspect.   Setting aside mainstream media hypocrisy, what is our best response to Horowitz’s Read more…

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Edward Herman: The Media-Rightwing Political Correctness Gambit Renewed: Horowitz And Reparations

The heavy media attention being given to rejections of David Horowitz’s ad on reparations for slavery is a throwback to the rightwing and "liberal media" political correctness campaign of 1991. In that earlier campaign, it was the alleged free speech threat of blacks, women, and other non-establishment groups trying to influence curricula and teaching appointments Read more…

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Mike Gould: Pax Americana

Pax Americana   By Mike Gould, a communication consultant based in the Netherlands   We live in a time of simplistic polarized views, whereas global politics may never have been more complex. Of particular difficulty for the West since the end of the Cold War has been the transition from a bipolar to a unipolar Read more…

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Sean Gonsalves: The sky is falling?

Gonsalves The sky is not falling. That used to be something you said to Armageddon aficionados as an antidote to their end-of-the-world predictions. It appears that cliché is in need of some revision. The Russian MIR space station is slated to crash land on earth today. On its decent, experts say most of the 135-ton Read more…

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Charles Glass: The first casualty

vast American aid was news, yet it never made the  news, although no one at ABC News at the time criticised the piece  or questioned its accuracy. At the time, however, I was able to write about it – in the  Spectator . When I moved to Lebanon in 1983, the Spectator ‘s  editor, Alexander Read more…

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Vijay Prashad: Magical Realism in the Fabulous World of the Indian Economy

Vijay Prashad Magical Realism is an Indian habitus discovered accidentally by Latin American fiction. Gabriel Garcia Marquez, may his recent illness be as painless as possible, wrote in a style that evokes for me the social relations of the Indian subcontinent. No wonder, then, that his technique is so freely, and profitably, used (most mimetically) Read more…

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